Top Ten Tuesday – Titles or Covers that Made Me Want to Read/Buy a Book

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that currently resides at The Artsy Reader Girl and features bloggers sharing lists on various book topics.  For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, participants are tasked with listing the top titles or covers that made them want to read or buy a book.  This is a pretty cool topic and it gives me an excuse to highlight some of my favourite covers and titles. 

I have a somewhat eclectic method of choosing what books I want to read.  While I mostly tend to read novels due to the author, plot description, recommendations from other reviewers, or because it is an entry in a series or franchise I like, quite a few first catch my eye due to colourful or crazy covers, or titles that really stand out (or a combination of the two).  I have a lot of love for authors who invest in beautiful covers to highlight their novel’s style or plot features, and I also really enjoy cool and catchy titles.  It honestly did not take me long to come up with a list of fun covers and titles, and I was eventually able to whittle it down into a Top Ten List.  I tried to avoid using any novel where something else drove me to check the novel out, although there are a couple of cool Star Wars examples I had to include.  I really enjoyed all the cool covers/titles below, especially as there are usually some great stories contained within them.

 

Honourable Mentions:

Star Wars: Vader – Dark Visions by Dennis Hallum

Vader-DarkVisions-TPB

It has Darth Vader decked out as a black knight, how could I possibly resist this comic?

 

Child of a Mad God by R. A. Salvatore

Child of a Mad God Cover

 

A People’s History of the Vampire Uprising by Raymond A. Villareal

A History of the Vampire Uprising Cover

 

Black Leviathan by Bend Perplies

Black Leviathan Cover

 

Top Ten Tuesday:

Mecha Samurai Empire by Peter Tieryas

Mecha Samurai Empire Cover

Let us start with an extremely cool cover and a very fun name, Mecha Samurai Empire.  I still remember the first time that I saw this book, as I was instantly drawn to the samurai mecha standing in front of a Japanese flag.  I also was very intrigued by the name, Mecha Samurai Empire, and I had to know more about it.  While the plot details did sway my decision, I already knew I was going to buy this book the moment I saw it.  It really did not disappoint either, with an exciting and clever story about mechas in an alternate United States that lost World War II.  This is such a great book, and the sequel, Cyber Shogun Revolution, follows the trend by having a fantastic cover a catchy title.

 

The Traitor God by Cameron Johnston

The Traitor God Cover

With a sleek, compelling name and a very well-crafted cover, The Traitor God quickly drew my attention before I even read the plot synopsis.  This cover perfectly captures the dark feel of the novel, and the mysterious title is a fantastic part of the plot.  This was a fantastic book, and led to a great sequel, God of Broken Things, which also featured an outstanding cover.

 

#Murdertrending by Gretchen McNeil

#MurderTrending Cover

I don’t know what drew me to #Murdertrending more, the unique, twitter-handled title, or the fun cover where a group of stick figures are in danger.  It probably was the title, and I liked the way in which McNeil was building up the novels critique of the social media obsessed world.  Overall, this cover/title combo really grabbed my attention and forced me to buy this book.

 

The Shadow of the Gods by John Gwynne

The Shadow of the Gods Cover

I have mentioned a few times that one of the reasons I checked out The Shadow of the Gods was because of positive reviews from other fantasy fans.  However, long before I heard about how good the story was, I found myself rather drawn to The Shadow of the Gods’ incredible cover.  The giant dragon facing off against a lone hero is exceptionally drawn, and I loved how the artist brings this scene to life in its own distinctive and unique way.  Suffice to say, this cool cover had The Shadow of the Gods well on my radar before it came out, and I probably would have read this novel, even if I had heard nothing from other reviewers.

 

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Gideon the Ninth Cover

Gideon the Ninth was another book where the cover dragged me in, although in all fairness, it is a pretty damn impressive cover.  The beautifully drawn artwork features a red-haired swordswoman with skull-themed face paint walking through a mass of exploding skeletons.  I mean, if that does not draw your interest and attention, nothing will.  In addition, when I received the book, it was a fantastic hardcover with black edging to the pages, which really gave of a mysterious and powerful theme to it.  I was so hooked even before I found out it was a novel about lesbian, space-faring necromancers, and seeing the plot only convinced me to read it quicker.  This was an outstanding novel, which Muir followed up last year with Harrow the Ninth, another novel with an extremely epic cover.

 

Strange Practice by Vivian Shaw

Strange Practice Cover

Strange Practice features a great cover with a doctor standing above a vampire filled coffin.  That outstanding cover contained so much detail, and I loved the combination of classic vampire aesthetics with a modern London backdrop to it.  The combination of black and white walls and characters against blood red floors, coverings and cityscape works surprisingly well, and it helps to deliver a very striking cover.  This awesome art really dragged me towards this book, and I had a wonderful time reading this and its fun sequel, Dreadful Company, which also featured an amazing cover.

 

City of Bastards by Andrew Shvarts

City of Bastards Cover

Ok, for this one, it was all about the name.  City of Bastards is such an evocative title, and it definitely caught my attention when I first saw it as it opens up so many different story and tonal possibilities.  Couple that with the pretty neat cover, which makes amazing use of colour (the purple and the blood red really work well together), and I was rather hooked on this book before I even picked it up and read what it was about.   

 

Star Wars: Death Troopers by Joe Schreiber

deathtrooperscover

A few years ago, while randomly skimming online, I saw the cover for Star Wars: Death Troopers, which really had me hooked (hah).  Something about that visual of a bloodied Storm Trooper helmet suspended by a meat hook really struck me, and it drove me to grab an audiobook version of that book that very night.  Thank goodness I did, as this was a really fun novel, that features zombies on a Star Destroyer attempting to eat Han and Chewie.  An outstanding book that is one of my favourite horror novels, thank goodness I saw this cover.

 

The Bone Ships by R. J. Barker

The Bone Ships Cover

Now, I must admit that I probably would have read this book even without seeing the name or cover.  I had already enjoyed Barker’s excellent Wounded Kingdom series (made up of Age of Assassins, Blood of Assassins and King of Assassins), so I would have been curious about his next series.  However, the moment I saw the cover for The Bone Ships, I knew that this book would be something special that I would need to read.  The incredible cover featuring a beautifully rendered dragon, is just amazing, and the title The Bone Ships, really fires up the imagination.  The combination of these features made The Bone Ships a must read from me well before I’d seen the plot, and it fully convinced me to get The Bone Ships, which ended up being one of the best books (and audiobooks of 2019). 

 

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City by K. J. Parker

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City Cover

When I first saw Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City, I initially wasn’t to impressed by the cover.  However, there was something about the unique name that got me curious enough to check out some more details and that’s when I found out that this was a fun sounding fantasy novel.  I had an absolute blast reading this novel, which was one of the best books of 2019, and it also led me to the sequel, How to Rule an Empire and Get Away With It, one of the most hilarious books I read last year.  I honestly might have missed this series if that catchy name and cover didn’t grab my attention, which would have been a real shame.

 

 

Well that brings another Top Ten Tuesday to a close.  As you can see from the above, there are some truly awesome and fun covers and titles in my reading history.  Each of these featured novels come highly recommended, and I hope you also like the titles and cover art.  I hope you enjoyed my latest list and let me know what covers or titles drew you to a book in the comments below.

Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Publisher: Recorded Books (Audiobook – 4 August 2020)

Series: The Locked Tomb – Book Two

Length: 19 hours and 51 minutes

My Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Sensational author Tamsyn Muir follows up her incredible 2019 debut with another epic, complex and infinitely entertaining hybrid novel, Harrow the Ninth.

Tamsyn Muir burst onto the writing scene with a real vengeance last year with her debut novel, Gideon the Ninth, the first book in The Locked Tomb series.  Gideon the Ninth was an extremely clever and compelling novel that followed a group of spacefaring necromancers who were summoned to the house of their Emperor and god, and given an opportunity to learn from him and become Lyctors, immortal beings with immense necromantic power who are considered to be living saints.  What they instead found was a haunted manor filled with secrets, weird experiments and mysterious hints at the past.  The protagonist of this first novel was the titular Gideon, a smart assed, foul mouthed lesbian swordswoman who was reluctantly serving the necromantic lady of the Ninth House, Harrowhark Nonagesimus.  I absolutely loved Gideon the Ninth and it was easily one of my favourite debuts of 2019.  As a result, I was rather intrigued when I heard about its sequel, Harrow the Ninth (which, as you can see above, featured another intense and beautiful cover by the talented Tommy Arnold) and I eagerly grabbed an audiobook copy of it when it came out.  I have to say that I am extremely glad that I decided to do so as Harrow the Ninth turned out to be a truly outstanding book and I had an incredible time reading it.

Harrow the Ninth is set shortly after the dramatic conclusion to Gideon the Ninth and switches the focus of the novel over to Harrowhark, who has succeeded in becoming a Lyctor at great personal cost.  Now alone, mentally scarred and more powerful than ever, Harrow finds herself in the personal care of the Emperor of the Nine Houses, who is determined to use his new Lyctor in a deadly war against an ancient and powerful terror, a Resurrection Beast, the insane and vengeful ghost of a murdered planet.

Travelling to the Mithraeum, the Emperor’s isolated sanctum, Harrow finds herself trapped aboard a desolate space station with her god and her fellow Lyctors.  Each of her companions on the station has their own agenda and motive for being there, and all of them are seeking to use Harrow for their own ends.  Worse, as Harrow attempts to learn the full extent of her new powers and abilities, it becomes apparent that something has gone wrong with her transition to Lyctorhood.  Her body keeps failing her, her swordcraft is shoddy, her blade makes her nauseous and her mind keeps presenting her with impossible scenarios.

As the Resurrection Beast comes ever closer to the Mithraeum, Harrow desperately attempts to understand everything that is happening to her and learn how to survive the oncoming attack.  However, she finds herself distracted with the machinations and plots of her untrustworthy rival and the attitudes of her three ancient tutors, especially as at least one of them is trying to kill her.  Can Harrow unwrap all of the dark secrets that lie hidden on the Mithraeum before it is too late, or will the entire Empire fall into ruin before them?

Well damn, now that was a truly enjoyable and incredible read.  Harrow the Ninth is a complex, clever, entertaining and exceptionally well written novel that does an awesome job following on from Muir’s impressive first novel.  I had an absolutely amazing time reading this fantastic book, which I think in many ways is somewhat stronger than Gideon the Ninth.  Not only does Harrow the Ninth have a deeply captivating story that successfully utilises elements from a range of different genres, but it also features some memorable and compelling characters, excellent universe building and a magical system that really stands out thanks to its descriptive necromantic powers.  Harrow the Ninth also serves as a marvellous follow-up to Gideon the Ninth, continuing the clever story from the first book with the same distinctive tone and writing style, while also featuring an intriguing reimagining of prior events.  All of these makes for an epic read which gets a full five-star rating from me.

At the heart of this amazing novel is an intense and multilayered narrative that presents a compelling tale of love, tragedy, treachery and self-discovery.  The story is actually split into several distinct sections, with the main storyline focusing on Harrow after her transformation to Lyctorhood as she spends time in the Mithraeum with the Emperor and the other Lyctors.  This part of the book expertly jumps back and forth through time and is an extremely entertaining part of the book, detailing Harrow’s education under the Emperor and the other Lyctors and her attempts to survive the various internal politics, plots and personal chaos.  The other major part of the story shows a curious alternate version of the events of Gideon the Ninth, shown from Harrow’s point of view, made distinctive due to the complete lack of Gideon, who appears to be erased out of existence.  This alternate version of the prior book is a really intriguing part of Harrow the Ninth’s story, and while I was initially a little confused about why it was included and where Gideon had disappeared to, it proved to be an extremely clever and compelling part of the book, especially when everything becomes fully revealed.  Due to this reimagining of already existing narrative, as well as the continued references to the events of the first book, readers interested in checking out Harrow the Ninth really do need to have read Gideon the Ninth first, as the story gets a little confusing and significantly less impactful without this established knowledge.

These separate storylines complement each other is exceedingly cleverly.  This novel does start off a tad slow, but this is mainly because Muir is re-establishing the narrative from the previous book and loading up the front end of the story with hints and foreshadowing about the multitude or revelations that come throughout the course of the plot.  A lot of big events and reveals occur towards the end of Harrow the Ninth, including a few reveals that were hinted at in the previous novel, and I felt that the author set all of these up perfectly.  This results in an extremely epic conclusion to the novel and I was really impressed by how it all turned out.  This novel contains a unique blend of genres, as Harrow the Ninth features elements from the fantasy, science fiction, psychological thriller and murder mystery genres.  All of these disparate features work together extremely well in the story and it helps to produce a distinctive and entertaining narrative, especially as Muir adds on a rather good comedic edge.  The end result is a fascinating and exceedingly captivating overarching narrative, and I had an outstanding time getting pleasantly blindsided by the inventive twists and turns.

This excellent and unique story is expertly supported by a distinctive writing style that I felt did an amazing job enhancing the narrative.  Perhaps one of the most noticeable elements is the clever narration that accompanies the story.  While Harrow is the point of view character for most of the novel, she is not actually the one narrating the story.  Instead Harrow’s actions, emotions and thoughts are identified, summarised, and relayed back to Harrow by an unidentified second person narrator.  Naturally, this proved to be an interesting and unusual way to tell this story, although it works well in the context of the overall narrative, even if it takes a little to get used to.  This narrative format plays into certain character reveals and plot points of the novel and it makes a lot of sense once you get further into the book, with the style itself actually being a hint about what is happening with Harrow.  This narration style changes at a certain point towards the end of the book in accordance with certain plot developments and the subsequent deviation is clever and reminiscent of past events.  I also really must highlight the author’s extremely descriptive form of story writing, as every event, person or location is described in overly vivid detail.  Not only did this ensure that the reader got the full breadth of certain magical action and developments but it also helped to enhance the overall gothic feel of the book and ensure that reader was able to easily imagine the various locations the protagonist found themself in.  This really helped the story to shine and I have a lot of love for how Muir was able to work story elements into this style.

In addition to the great story that Muir has come up with for this book, Harrow the Ninth also boasts an impressive array of amazing characters.  The central protagonist is the titular Harrow, who takes over from Gideon as the main character after the first book.  Harrow is a vastly different character to Gideon as she has a much more subdued personality, less self-esteem, and a more restrained, subtler sense of humour.  Due to Gideon’s somewhat biased narration in the first novel Harrow was mostly viewed as an extremely arrogant, confident, and brilliant person, and this is how Harrow attempts to act throughout most of the novel.  However, certain vulnerabilities in Harrow’s character that were previously explored in Gideon the Ninth once again come to the fore in this second novel.  Harrow was already an extremely complex individual, having been birthed by dark magic, ended up being responsible for the death of her own parents and having an interesting love interest.  However, following her alteration into Lyctorhood, Harrow is a much more damaged person due to the absorption of her cavalier.  Harrow’s already fractured psyche is made even worse throughout the course of the book, as she sees all manner of things that are not there and has some very different ideas of the past or how she perceives the world.  In addition, Harrow bears an immense amount of guilt on her shoulders as a result of various events in her past and the many deaths on her conscience.  Harrow needs to work through all these issues throughout the course of the story if she has a chance to survive, and this becomes a major and dramatic part of the story that was really intriguing to explore.  I had an amazing time seeing the story primarily through Harrow’s eyes and it was a refreshing and compelling change of pace from the first book.

Harrow the Ninth also focuses on a great collection of supporting characters who add some intrigue and drama to the story.  Perhaps the most distinctive side characters in this novel are the five beings that Harrow finds herself trapped with aboard the Mithraeum, the Emperor of the Nine Houses and his four other Lyctors.  This is an extremely fascinating collection of people and much of the story revolves around Harrow’s unique interactions with them as each of them attempts to teach her, manipulate her or kill her at various points within the book.  These characters are really entertaining and distinctive, from the seemingly kind, patient, and infinitely calm Emperor, to the three ancient Lyctors, the cool and confident Augustine, the exceedingly self-involved Mercymorn and the ultra-focused and lethal Ortus.  In addition, we see the return of the manipulative Ianthe, who became a Lyctor at the same time as Harrow and who forms a very distinctive relationship with her throughout the course of the book.  I really enjoyed the complex interactions and relationships that forms between all of these characters (including some wild relationships between various participants), with the Emperor acting as the father figure, the three existing Lyctors portrayed as older siblings who have a complicated power dynamic with each other, while Ianthe and Harrow are the younger sisters learning the ropes from the others.

I also have to highlight the inclusion of several other characters who previously appeared in Gideon the Ninth.  It was rather intriguing to see many of these characters return, especially as most of them died or appeared to die in the prior novel.  Muir does a fantastic job working them into the fabric of this novel, such as by featuring some of them in the alternate version of the events of the first book, changing their roles and impacts on the story as a result.  I particularly enjoyed the extended role of Ortus, cavalier of the Ninth House.  Ortus, not to be confused with the Lyctor mentioned above (although the names are actually a clever clue to a big reveal), died early on in the events of Gideon the Ninth.  But in this book the dour Ortus serves as a fantastic yet reluctant companion to Harrow, with surprising hidden depths and an entertaining obsession with gloomy epic poems and verse.  He is also essentially the complete opposite to Gideon, resulting in a very different dynamic between necromancer and cavalier then we saw in the prior book.  Overall, I have to say that I was exceedingly impressed with the characters featured within this amazing novel.  Each of these complex and memorable characters added a heck of a lot to the story and it was deeply fascinating to see each of their storylines unravel and come to their compelling conclusions.

One of the major elements of this series that I love so much is the weird and wonderful necromantic magical system complements the science fiction of the book.  Pretty much all of the main characters in this book are powerful necromancers, specialising in a different form or style of necromantic magic.  All of this magic is extremely cool, and it was really awesome seeing it utilised in fight sequences and other scenes throughout the book.  Most of the magical elements revolve around Harrow’s bone magic, as she creates skeleton and bone constructs, manipulates her own bones to either enhance herself or detach them to make weapons or other creations, as well as elements of biological alteration.  Muir does an outstanding job explaining the full range of different powers that Harrow has, and there are some amazing scenes where the young necromancer does some really inventive and clever things with her bones.  There is one sequence in particular that sticks in the mind, and I’ll certainly remember it when eating soup in the future. 

In addition to Harrow’s abilities, Muir also showcases the creative and impactful abilities and magical powers that some of the other characters have.  These various abilities are all biological or spiritual in nature, and it was quite fun to see what the different necromancers can do, especially when they go up against Harrow’s bone magic.  All these magic scenes feature some rather vivid imagery and descriptions from Muir as she tries to show the full biological manipulations that are occurring, which really help to make these scenes pop.  The author also does a truly fascinating deep dive into the origins and mechanics of her unique magical system.  A lot of these new magical elements are explained to protagonist in some detail from one of her teachers, so the reader is able to understand these elements really well, and a lot of the lessons and explanations of magic have major impacts on the story down the line.  This proved to be an extremely interesting and enjoyable part of the book and I have a lot of love for Muir’s creativity when it comes to her version of necromantic magic.

I also have a lot of love for the distinctive gothic settings that Muir has imagined up for this series.  Each of the central story locations are filled up with all manner of dark and macabre trappings and features, which the author does a fantastic job bringing to life with her descriptive writing.  This includes the dreary and dark Mithraeum, a vast and mostly abandoned space station where most of the story takes place, as well as an alternate version of the First House that appeared in Gideon the Ninth.  All of these locations are described in great detail and each of these fun and distinctive settings helps to present a darker vibe to story and helps makes this series more unique and memorable as a result.  Harrow the Ninth also contains some rather captivating and inventive universe building expansions as the author attempts to introduce new things into her universe.  All of these extensions to this universe are really clever, playing into the story really well and I loved learning more about this fun fictional setting which does so much to enhance the story. 

I found that the audiobook format of Harrow the Ninth proved to be an excellent way to enjoy this amazing novel.  With a run length of just under 20 hours the Harrow the Ninth audiobook does require a bit of a commitment to get through it, although I felt that it was really worth the time investment.  I do have to admit that it took me a little while to finish this audiobook, especially at the start.  However, I absolutely flew through the second half of the novel once I became extremely invested in the story, and I managed to knock out the final six hours in rather short succession.  I have to highlight the fantastic narrator for this audiobook, Moria Quirk, who does an outstanding job telling the story and bringing the various characters to life.  I felt that Quirk utilised perfect voices for each of the main characters and you get a real sense of each character’s personalities and emotions from this vocal work, from the calm, composed tones of the Emperor to the exceedingly petulant voice of the Lyctor Mercymorn.  This excellent voice work really added a lot to this audiobook. I really think that Harrow the Ninth translates well into the audiobook format, and listening to it really added to my enjoyment of this second novel, especially as I absorbed a lot more of the detail and gothic atmosphere through the narration.

Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir was an epic and exceptional piece of fiction that I deeply enjoyed, and which comes highly recommended.  Not only did Muir present an impressive follow-up to her amazing debut novel, Gideon the Ninth, but she was able to turn out a complex and beautifully written sequel that proved extremely hard to stop listening to.  Powerful, cleverly written and just generally outrageous, Harrow the Ninth is an outstanding read and you have no discovered Tamysn Muir and her fantastic pieces of literature, you are really missing out. 

Top Ten Tuesday – My Top Ten Favourite Debut Novels of 2019

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that currently resides at The Artsy Reader Girl and features bloggers sharing lists on various book topics. For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday I continue to look at what some of my favourite books of 2019 were. I have already looked at my favourite audiobooks of 2019, as well as my favourite new-to-me authors, so this week I am going to list my Top Ten Favourite Debut Novels of 2019.

2019 has been a good year for debuting authors in a number of different genres, and I have been lucky enough to check out some remarkable debut novels that I have really enjoyed. As a result, I think it is only proper that I highlight some of these great debuts, all of which I would strongly recommend. I was very impressed with a number of these debut books, and I am looking forward to seeing what these authors come up with in the future.

I was able to come up with 10 amazing novels for this list, although in one or two cases I might have slightly stretched the definition of debut. I am also very aware that I missed a number of terrific sounding debut novels in 2019, which, if I had read them, may have appeared on this list. No doubt several of these books will appear on a future Top Ten Books I Wish I Had Read in 2019 list I am planning. However, I am very happy with the list I have come up with, and look forward to checking out some more awesome debuts in 2020

Honourable Mentions:

Red Metal by Mark Greaney and Lieutenant Colonel Hunter Ripley Rawlings IV (USMC)

Red Metal Cover

I have included Red Metal in my honourable mentions because it was the debut novel of one of the authors, Lieutenant Colonel Hunter Ripley Rawlings IV (USMC). This was one of my favourite books of 2019; however, as it was co-written with an established author, I decided to leave it off my main list. I really hope that Rawlings continues to write, and I would love to see some form of sequel to Red Metal in the future.

Shadow of Athens by JM Alvey

shadows of athens cover

Shadow of Athens was another fantastic book, and I really liked the amazing historical mystery it contained. However, it is not technically a debut as the author has already written a number of fantasy books under the name of Juliet E. McKenna. That being said, I decided to give it an honourable mention as it was the debut novel of this pseudonym, and it was also the author’s first historical fiction novel.

Top Ten List (in no particular order):


Master of Sorrows
by Justin Call

Master of Sorrows Cover

Let us start the list with one of the best fantasy debuts of the year. Master of Sorrows was a compelling new fantasy adventure that focused on a school that trained operatives to steal and contain dangerous magical artefacts. Featuring an inventive new fantasy world and an intriguing story, this was a great start to a new series, and the sequel, Master Artificer, is coming out in August next year.

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Gideon the Ninth Cover

The second book on my list is Gideon the Ninth, which is certainly one of the most entertaining books I read this year. Gideon the Ninth is a madcap blend of science fiction and fantasy, with necromancers in space, which also features a great murder mystery storyline and a fun collection of characters. The sequel to this book, Harrow the Ninth, is coming out in June, and it sounds like it will be a pretty amazing read.

We Are Blood and Thunder by Kesia Lupo

We are Blood and Thunder Cover

This was a really clever and well-written young adult fantasy read that featured an excellent use of two separate character perspectives to tell a captivating story. Lupo’s second novel, the upcoming We Are Bound by Stars, will be set in the same universe as We Are Blood and Thunder, and should prove to be an intriguing follow-up to this fantastic novel.

Blood & Sugar by Laura Shepherd-Robinson

Blood & Sugar Cover

To my mind, Blood & Sugar was the best historical fiction debut of 2019, and I had an outstanding time reading it earlier this year. This book featured a complex and addictive murder mystery storyline set during the height of the English slave trade. Really worth checking out and I am looking forward to the author’s next book, Daughters of Night.

Legacy of Ash by Matthew Ward

Legacy of Ash Cover

This is actually the book I am reading at the moment, but I am enjoying it so much I had to add it to this list. Legacy of Ash is a massive read that blends great fantasy elements with some exciting political intrigue. It is a really fun novel, and I am intrigued to see how it finishes up.

Half Moon Lake by Kirsten Alexander

Half Moon Lake Cover

Half Moon Lake is another excellent historical fiction novel that provided an amazing account of a shocking kidnapping case from history. This was a deeply compelling story, and well worth checking out.

The Gutter Prayer by Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan

the gutter prayer cover

The Gutter Prayer was one of the most anticipated fantasy debuts of 2019, and it actually lived up to its hype. With an outstanding group of characters and some truly unique and memorable new fantasy elements, this was a terrific and dark read, and the upcoming sequel, The Shadow Saint, should prove to be a fantastic follow-up to it.

Blood in the Dust by Bill Swiggs

Blood in the Dust Cover

Bill Swiggs’s debut novel, Blood in the Dust, was a cool Australian take on the western genre that I knocked off in one long night. An action-packed and dramatic historical adventure, this was a compelling Australian read which I was really glad I checked out.

Star Wars: Force Collector by Kevin Shinick

ForceCollector-Cover

I only just put up a review for this last night, but it was a brilliant Star Wars adaption that ties together the events of a number of the films into a fantastic young adult novel. This debut is well worth reading, and I hope that Shinick revisits the Star Wars universe in the future.

Warrior of the Altaii by Robert Jordan

Warrior of the Altaii Cover

The final book on my list is Warrior of the Altaii by Robert Jordan, which is Jordan’s previously unpublished first novel. Technically, this isn’t a debut novel per se, as his first published novel was released in the 1970s. However, as this novel is one of the first things Jordan wrote, and it helped him break into the fantasy genre and eventually produce one of the best fantasy series of all times, I think it is appropriate to include it on this list, and the old-school adventure it contains was actually pretty good.

That’s my Top Ten list for this week. I am pretty happy with the varied collection of debut novels I read this year, and I think that all the above authors are going to go to do amazing things. Let me know what your favourite 2019 debut novels are in the comments below.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten New Authors I am Thankful I Checked Out This Year

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that currently resides at The Artsy Reader Girl and features bloggers sharing lists on various book topics. For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, readers have a Thanksgiving Freebie, so I am taking this chance to mention those authors who I am thankful I checked out for the first time this year.

In 2019, I had the pleasure of reading a number of different books that ranged from impressive debuts, intriguing sequels, amazing starts to new series, fun standalone novels and fantastic entries in long-running series. While a number of these books were written by authors I was previously familiar with (such as some of my autobuy authors), quite a few of these books were written by authors I had not had the pleasure of reading before, but who I am very glad that I checked out. I have to say that I was really impressed with a number of these authors, and for many of them I am planning to try and read more of their works. As a result, I thought that it would be a good idea to do a list honouring my absolute favourites of this group. This list is not limited to debuting authors, but also includes authors whose works I only just got a chance to read this year.

Like many of these lists that I do, I ended up with quite a substantial group of authors I wanted to include on this list. I really enjoyed their books that I read this year and I am looking forward to reading more from them in the future. I was eventually able to whittle this list down to my top ten favourites, as well as a generous honourable mentions section. Unfortunately, I had to exclude a couple of authors who I really liked, such as Laura Shepherd-Robinson, who wrote the fantastic historical mystery Blood & Sugar; and Australian young adult author Jay Kristoff, who wrote some fun books this year, including DEV1AT3 and Aurora Rising (co-written with Amie Kaufman). Still, I think I came up with a good list that represents which authors I am really thankful I tried for the first time this year.

Honourable Mentions:

Tamsyn Muir – Gideon the Ninth

Gideon the Ninth Cover

Gideon the Ninth, the debut novel of Tamsyn Muir, was one of the most unique and entertaining books that I read this year. I absolutely loved the combination of weird comedy, interesting futuristic necromantic magic and the curious murder house storyline, and it was an overall fantastic novel. I definitely want to check out the future books in the series, especially as the second book, Harrow the Ninth, already has a cool cover and plot synopsis up.

Steve Berry – The Malta Exchange

The Malta Exchange Cover

The Malta Exchange is the 14th book in Berry’s long-running Cotton Malone thriller series. Not only did it feature a clever and complex modern-day thriller, but the author utilised some deeply fascinating historical elements to create a powerful and captivating mystery. I am very keen to read more from Berry in the future, and his next book, The Warsaw Protocol, sounds like it is going to be a very fun read.

Claudia Gray – Master and Apprentice

Master & Apprentice Cover

I had to feature a Star Wars novel on this list somewhere, and I actually had a hard time choosing which book from a new author I enjoyed the most. While I strongly considered Tarkin and Resistance Reborn, my favourite Star Wars story from an author I had not read before this year was probably Master and Apprentice by Claudia Gray. Gray did an outstanding job crafting together an action-packed and intriguing Star Wars story that focused on a younger Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. Clever, entertaining and deeply emotional at times, this was a fantastic read and I hope that Gray writes some more Star Wars novels in the future.

Samantha Shannon – The Priory of the Orange Tree

The Priory of the Orange Tree Cover

The Priory of the Orange Tree was a massive and inventive standalone fantasy novel that was released at the start of the year. I really liked the excellent story and unique fantasy universe that Shannon created in this book, and she is definitely an author to keep an eye on for the future.

Top Ten List (in no particular order):

Mark Greaney – Red Metal and Mission Critical

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Let us start this list off with the fantastic thriller writer Mark Greaney. I first became familiar with Greaney earlier this year when I read Mission Critical, the electrifying eighth book in his Gray Man series. While I quite enjoyed Mission Critical, his authorship of the military thriller Red Metal, which he co-wrote with Lt. Col. Hunter Ripley Rawlings IV. USMC is the main reason why I am including him on this list. Red Metal is easily one of my favourite books of 2019 and that, combined with an excellent thriller in Mission Critical, is why Greaney is an author I will be reading much more of in the future.

Miles Cameron – Cold Iron and Dark Forge

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I am slightly cheating with this entry as I have actually read some of this author’s historical fiction books which he writes under the name Christian Cameron. However, 2019 was the first year that I read the books he publishes under his fantasy nom de plume Miles Cameron, and I feel the name and genre change justifies his inclusion on this list. I previously featured Cameron’s 2018 release Cold Iron on my Top Ten Books I Wish I Read in 2018 list, and I ended up listening to it a couple of months later. Cold Iron, the first book in his new Masters & Mages series, was an absolutely incredible fantasy read. I also listened the second book in the series, Dark Forge, a couple of weeks ago, and it was a pretty amazing follow-up to Cold Iron (review coming soon). Not only am I planning to read the final book in the Masters & Mages series, Bright Steel, as soon as I can, but I will also be grabbing every new fantasy book that the author releases as Miles Cameron, and I am very glad I checked out his alternate genre of writing. In the meantime, make sure to check out my review for Cameron’s latest historical fiction novel, The New Achilles, which he also released this year.

James Lovegrove – Firefly books – Big Damn Hero and The Magnificent Nine

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I had to include James Lovegrove on this list, as he has been the main author pushing through the new generation of Firefly tie-in novels. I absolutely love Firefly, so any tie-in material is going to get a lot of attention from me. Lovegrove has actually written both of the books so far, including the emotional Big Damn Hero (based on story ideas from Nancy Holder) and the fun The Magnificent Nine. Both of these Firefly books were really good, and I loved the cool stories and the nostalgia I felt from seeing the television show’s great characters in action again. Lovegrove has a third Firefly novel on the way, with The Ghost Machine coming out in April, and it looks to be another fantastic addition to the series.

Chris Wooding – The Ember Blade

the ember blade cover

The Ember Blade is another book that I regretted not reading in 2018, so I was very thankful that I got a chance to listen to it earlier this year. Wooding is a very talented fantasy writer whose outstanding character work and inventive story, created an incredible read in The Ember Blade. I am really excited for any sequels to this book that Wooding releases, which should prove to be very awesome.

Simon Turney – Commodus

Commodus Cover

When I first heard about Commodus by Simon Turney, I was quite intrigued, mainly because I knew so little about this emperor other than the fact that he was the villain of the film Gladiator. However, this is probably one of my favourite historical fiction releases of the year, as Turney did an outstanding job bringing this complex historical figure to life. I cannot wait to see which Roman emperor Turney writes about next, and I have a feeling that he is soon going to become one of my favourite historical fiction authors.

K. J. Parker – Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City Cover

Before receiving a copy of Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City, I had not read any books by this author, either under the name K. J. Parker or his other writing persona, Tom Holt. This is a real shame, as Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City was one of the best and funniest fantasy novels I have ever read, and I can only imagine that his other works are just as awesome. I am really thankful that this author is on my radar now, and I look forward to seeing what else he can do.

Kieron Gillen and Salvador Larroca – Darth Vader (2015) and Star Wars (2015) comic series

Star Wars - Darth Vader Volume 1 Cover

While I did read the Darth Vader: Dark Lord of the Sith comics in 2018 (check out my reviews for Volumes Two and Three), 2019 was the year that I really got into Star Wars comics, and that is mainly due to the cool partnership of writer Kieron Gillen and artist Salvador Larroca. Not only did I start reading their 2015 Darth Vader series this year, which is just so many layers of awesome, but I have been eating up their recent run on the ongoing Star Wars comic books series. In addition, the Doctor Aphra series, which has to be one of the best comics of the year, is based on the character they created in the Darth Vader series. Gillen also wrote the first 19 issues of the Doctor Aphra series, which feature some absolutely outstanding stories. Pretty much everything Star Wars that these two touch is magical, and I really, really hope they continue their partnership well into the future.

Ben Aaronovitch – Lies Sleeping

Lies Sleeping Cover

Lies Sleeping was the seventh book in the Peter Grant/Rivers of London series, which was released late last year. I got around to reading it at the start of 2019 and I was deeply impressed with this clever fantasy/modern crime fiction hybrid. While I spent a good part of the year kicking myself for not reading any of Aaronovitch’s books sooner, I will hopefully start to make up for this oversight in the near future. The next book in the series, False Value, is set for release in a couple of months, and it sounds like another fantastic addition to the series.

Blake Crouch – Recursion

Recursion Cover

Blake Crouch has a long history of writing clever science fiction and thriller novels, but Recursion, which was released earlier this year, is the first one of his books that I checked out. I absolutely loved this complex and captivating story and it was easily one of the top books I read in the first half of 2019. While I still need to actually write a review for Recursion (I’m working on one at the moment), I will make sure to grab any of his books that come out in the future.

Brian McClellan – Promise of Blood

promise of blood cover

The final author I am glad I checked out this year was Brian McClellan, author of the acclaimed Powder Mage series of flintlock fantasy novels. I had heard a lot of good things about McClellan’s books, so I decided to check out the first book in the series, Promise of Blood. I was not disappointed in the slightest, as this was an exceptional piece of fantasy fiction that blew me away (pun intended). I will be listening to all the Powder Mage books in the future, and I am extremely thankful that I checked him out this year.

Well that’s the end of this Top Ten Tuesday article. I hope you like my list and please let me know which new authors you are thankful you checked out this year. To anyone reading in America, happy Thanksgiving and I hope you don’t go too crazy trying to get new books this Black Friday.

WWW Wednesday – 11 September 2019

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

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The Dirty Dozen by Lynda La Plante (Trade Paperback)

Hoping to finish this one off tonight.  It’s another great addition to the Jane Tennison series that is really worth checking out.

Extinction Machine by Jonathan Maberry (Audiobook)

With the next Joe Ledger series from Jonathan Maberry starting in a few months, I thought I would try to get further into this series.  Only a few hours in to this one already, but I think I will be giving this one another five-star review.

What did you recently finish reading?

Since my last WWW Wednesday I have finished off a few good books.

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Hardcover)

Gideon the Ninth Cover


The Possession
by Michael Rutger (Audiobook)

The Possession Cover


Star Trek: The Original Series – The Antares Maelstrom
by Greg Cox (Audiobook)

Star Trek - The Antares Maelstrom Cover

Assassin’s Code by Jonathan Maberry (Audiobook)

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This was another outstanding entry in the Joe Ledger series and I am hoping to get a review of this one done soon.  In the mean time check out my reviews for some of the other books in this series including Patient Zero, The Dragon Factory, The King of Plagues and Deep Silence.

What do you think you’ll read next?

The Man That Got Away by Lynne Truss (Trade Paperback)

The Man That Got Away Cover


That’s it for this week.  I’m going to be busy in the next few weeks so it might be a little while until I do WWW Wednesday again, but make sure to check back later to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Gideon the Ninth Cover

Publisher: Tor (Hardcover – 10 September 2019)

Series: The Ninth House – Book One

Length: 448 pages

My Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

From debuting author Tamsyn Muir comes a very unique and compelling science fiction novel filled with death, comedy and necromancers in space, Gideon the Ninth.

Before I begin reviewing Gideon the Ninth, I have to point out how impressive the design of the hardcover copy I received was. When I previously featured this book in one of my Waiting on Wednesday articles, I mentioned how much I loved the cover art. Indeed, the drawing of the book’s titular redheaded character with her face painted liked a skull surrounded by exploding skeletons is pretty damn cool. The hardcover copy also has some excellent visuals, as the outer rim of all the pages is coloured black, which definitely gives prospective readers a noticeable visual hook, especially when combined with the all-black binding underneath the jacket, emblazoned with gold writing on the spine and a single golden skull on the front. I really liked this fantastic presentation style, and it definitely left an impression on me as I started to read the book.

In the far future, a vast interstellar empire is ruled by necromancers whose control over the various magical disciplines of death make them a powerful force. Eight noble houses serve under the First House of the Emperor, and each of them has just received a message from their ruler. The heirs to each of these houses and their cavaliers, loyal sword-wielding protectors and companions, must attend the Emperor’s planet in order to compete to become the next generation of Lyctor, immortal beings of vast power.

Gideon Nav is an indentured servant to the Ninth House of the Empire, a small and impoverished house that carries a dark reputation. A skilled swordswoman, Gideon wants nothing more than to enlist in the imperial army to leave the dark crypts, the strict occult nuns and the multitude of skeletons that make up the Ninth Planet far behind. However, when her latest escape attempt fails, she finds herself offered an irresistible bargain: act as the Ninth House’s cavalier for the period of the trials and be granted her freedom. There is just one minor problem: Gideon and the heir to the Ninth House, Harrowhark Nonagesimus, an extremely powerful bone witch, absolutely hate each other.

Forced to temporarily put their differences aside, Gideon and Harrow travel to First House, only to discover it is a near ruin, looked after by a few old and mostly unhelpful servants. They soon learn that the secrets to becoming a Lyctor lie hidden within the walls around them, and the representatives of various houses can do whatever they wish to learn them. Trapped on the planet, Gideon and Harrow begin to explore the First House and encounter the heirs and cavaliers of the other houses. As the mismatched pair from the Ninth House start to unravel the various mysteries and challenges before them, a gruesome murder occurs. Something powerful is lurking within the First House, and it has the heirs in its sight. Can Gideon and Harrow work together, or will their own turbulent past and the secrets of their house tear them apart?

Gideon the Ninth is a chaotically clever and massively entertaining first novel from Tamsyn Muir, who has done an excellent job introducing readers to her intriguing new world. Gideon the Ninth is the first book in her The Ninth House series, which already has two planned sequels in the works, with the first of these currently set for release next year. After hearing the awesome plot synopsis for this book earlier in the year, I had picked this as potentially being on the best books for the latter half of 2019. I am glad to see that my instincts were once again correct, as this was an awesome read that gets four and a half stars from me.

Muir has produced an outstanding story for her first novel, as the plot for Gideon the Ninth is an amazing combination of humour, universe building, emotional character moments and a captivating set of mysteries as the protagonists attempt to uncover not only the vast secrets of the First House but the identity of the person or being that is killing them off one by one. The author has stacked this book with all manner of fantastic twists, and there are a number of major and game changing developments that are well paced out amongst the story. There is never a dull spot within the book, as even parts where no substantial plot developments are occurring are filled with excellent humour from the sarcastic narrator with a huge vocabulary of various swear words. There is also a substantial amount of action throughout the course of the book. The various fight scenes blister and explode off the page, especially thanks to the unique magical system that Muir has populated this world with. All of this results in an addictive and electrifying overall story with a very memorable ending.

The real heart of Gideon the Ninth lies in its incredible main characters, Gideon Nav and Harrowhark Nonagesimus, and the complex relationship the two of them have. Gideon is the badass, rebellious, coarse, girl-loving mistress of the blade, who serves as the book’s narrator and only point-of-view character. Gideon is an absolute blast as a main character, as she deals with every situation she comes across with an abundance of disrespect, anger and exaggerated responses, resulting in much of the book’s humour. Harrow, on the other hand, is the dark noble necromancer heir to the Ninth House, whose reserved persona, obsession with necromantic research and abilities, and vindictive nature work to make her initially appear as a polar opposite to Gideon. The relationship between these two main characters is initially extremely adversarial, as both characters declare their absolute hatred for each other, and Harrow seems determined to make Gideon’s life a living hell. As the book progresses, however, Muir really dives into the heart of the relationship between the two characters, revealing a complex history and a twin tale of woe and dark secrets that has defined them for their entire lives. The combined character arc of these two main characters was done extremely well. While you knew from the very start of the book that the two characters would eventually work together, the exact reason why this occurred was handled perfectly, and the final form of this cooperation helps create an epic and tragic conclusion to the entire book. While their relationship is not explicitly romantic (Harrow’s sexuality really is not explored in this book), they do become quite close by the end of the novel, and both characters are written exceedingly well.

In addition to Gideon and Harrow, Muir has also included a range of different characters, representing the heirs and cavaliers of the other major houses in the Empire. This results in an intriguing assortment of side characters who add a lot to the overall story. The author has made sure to invest in substantial backstories for all these additional characters, and this has a number of significant benefits for the story. Not only are the readers now blessed with an abundance of viable and duplicitous suspects for the story’s murder mystery, but each of the various representatives of the houses have their own individual secrets and motives for being at the First House. Learning more about each of these characters is quite fascinating, and a number of them have some pretty amazing character arcs. I particularly enjoyed the storyline of Palamedes Sextus of the Sixth House, who treats his necromancy more as a science than a form of magic. Sextus is the most logical character out of all the people in the book, and he serves as a major driving force of the investigation into the murders. His connection to some of the other characters in the book is a major part of the book, and the ultimate conclusion of his story arc is really cool. Muir has done an incredible job coming up with the book’s various characters, and it is a major part of why this book is so awesome.

It is quite clear that Muir has an amazing imagination, as she has produced a grim and compelling new universe to set this book in. Necromancy and a futuristic science fiction setting make for a fascinating combination, and I really loved her examination of an empire built on worshipping an immortal, necromantic Emperor and the various secrets that come with it. The sheer range of different necromantic magic featured within this book is pretty impressive, especially as each of the Imperial Houses has their own specific form of necromancy, all of which are examined throughout the book. Not only are all these different types of magic really fascinating to examine but it also results in some diverse pieces of magical action, as many of the necromancers unleash their various forms of magic throughout the book, resulting in some fantastic sequences. I do think that the author could have done a slightly better job of explaining some of the unique elements of her universe at the start of the book, as I got a little confused at some points towards the beginning; however, this was quickly chased away by deeper dives into the universe’s lore later in the book. Muir has left open a number of questions and plot directions to explore in future books in the series, and I am really curious to see what happens next.

Gideon the Ninth is a wild and exciting novel that makes use of an intriguing concept, some compelling characters and an excellent story to create an exceedingly entertaining book that was a heck of a lot of fun to read. Featuring laugh-out-loud humour, intense action and major emotional moments, this is an incredible read that is really worth checking out. Muir has hit it out of the park with her debut novel, and I cannot wait for the next book in the series.

Book Haul – 2 September 2019

Its been a little quiet on the new book front lately, but I have managed to obtain a few amazing sounding novels over the last couple of weeks.  This is a combination of top books I got from some Australian publishers, and a few more books I bought on my Kindle in preparation for an upcoming trip.

Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Gideon the Ninth Cover

This is an intriguing debut book from a new author that I have been looking forward to for a while.  I have actually already finished this book off, and my review for it will be up in a few minutes.

The Man That Got Away by Lynne Truss

The Man That Got Away Cover

The Man That Got Away is another book that I have been looking forward to for a while.  I loved the previous book in the series, A Shot in the Dark, and I reckon this is going to be one of the funniest reads of 2019.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge: Black Spire
by Delilah S. Dawson

Galaxy's Edge - Black Spire Cover

The first of several awesome sounding Star Wars books that are coming out in the second half of 2019.  This should be an interesting read and I am keen to check it out.

The Cruel Stars by John Birmingham

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This is a cool new science fiction epic that recently caught me eye.  It sounds like it could be pretty amazing and I am sure it is going to be an exciting read.

The Brink by James S. Murray and Darren Wearmouth

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The sequel to Murray and Wearmouth’s first collaboration, Awakened, The Brink promises to be another fun and exciting horror thriller.

Unleashed by Amy McCulloch

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The first book in this series, Jinxed, was one of my favourite young adult books from last year, so I am keen to check out the sequel.
Another successful book haul that I am pretty happy with.  Which of these books are you keen for me to review?

WWW Wednesday – 28 August 2019

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

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Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Hardcover)

This is a fun science fiction novel, and features lesbian necromancers in space.  I have been looking forward to this one for a while and so far it is pretty good.

The Possession by Michael Rutger (Audiobook)

The follow up to last years awesome novel, The Anomaly, The Possession is another cool book that has a pretty intriguing horror storyline.  I had hoped to finish this book off today, but my phone crashed for a bit.  I should get it knocked off tomorrow and will hopefully get a review up for it soon.

What did you recently finish reading?

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The Harp of Kings by Juliet Marillier (Trade Paperback)

Red Metal by Mark Greaney and Lt. Col. H. Ripley Rawlings IV. USMC (Audiobook)

What do you think you’ll read next?

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Ok, I will admit it, these are a couple of nerdy choices, but both sound really cool and I am looking forward to checking them out.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge – Black Spire by Delilah S. Dawson (Trade Paperback)

The latest Star Wars novel for 2019.  I am curious to see how a book whose release is mainly thanks to a theme park ride turns out, but I reckon it should be a fantastic read.

Star Trek: The Original Series – The Antares Maelstrom by Greg Cox (Audiobook)

I have been really getting into Star Trek fiction lately, especially the audiobook formats which are particularly good. The Antares Maelstrom has an interesting sounding plot, and I have previously enjoyed the audiobook narrator’s work in Available Light and The Captain’s Oath.  I should start listening to this book tomorrow and hopefully I will be able to power through it fairly quickly.

That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

Top Ten Tuesday – Most Anticipated July-December 2019 Releases

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that currently resides at The Artsy Reader Girl and features bloggers sharing lists on various book topics.  For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, bloggers get to talk about the which ten books they are looking forward to the most in the second half of 2019.

2019 has so far been an amazing year for books.  Not only have I had the chance to read and review some outstanding novels in the first half of this year but I also have a huge pile of books to read sitting on my table at home (OK, several huge piles on several different surfaces).  However, there are still some incredible-sounding books coming out in the next six months, and I already have my eye on a number of them.  It took me a little while, but I was able to come up with the top ten books that I am looking forward to, as well as a couple of honourable mentions.

People familiar with my blog will no doubt notice that I have already featured several of these books before in my weekly Waiting on Wednesday feature (I’ll link in these Waiting on Wednesday posts), which hopefully highlights how much I want them.  I have also included a couple of other books that I have yet to do a Waiting on Wednesday for, although I will likely do so in the future.  I have also excluded a couple of books from this list because I already have copies for them; that’s why you won’t see Angel Mage by Garth Nix or Cold Storage by David Koepp on this list.

Honourable Mentions:

A Little Hatred by Joe Abercrombie – 19 September 2019

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I loved this latest cover of A Little Hatred so much I had to include it, looks pretty awesome.

The Bone Ships by R. J. Barker – 24 September 2019

The Bone Ships Cover


Star Wars: Resistance Reborn by Rebecca Roanhorse – 12 November 2019

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This is going to be one of the tie-in novels to the upcoming Star Wars movie, The Rise of Skywalker, and should be pretty awesome.

Top Ten List (in order of release date):

1. Howling Dark by Christopher Ruocchio – 4 July 2019

Howling Dark Cover


2. The Bear Pit by S. G. MacLean – 11 July 2019

The Bear Pit Cover


3. Star Wars: Thrawn: Treason by Timothy Zahn – 23 July 2019

Thrawn Treason Cover


4. Spaceside by Michael Mammay – 27 August 2019

Spaceside Cover


5. Loki: Where Mischief Lies by Mackenzi Lee – 3 September 2019

Loki Where Mischief Lies


6. Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir – 10 September 2019

Gideon the Ninth Cover


7. Firefly: Generations by Tim Lebbon – 15 October 2019

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I have been really enjoying this new series of Firefly novels, including Big Damn Hero and The Magnificent Nine, and this third book sounds pretty epic.


8. Salvation Lost by Peter F. Hamilton – 29 October 2019

Salvation Lost Cover


9. Starsight by Brandon Sanderson – 26 November 2019

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The first book in this series, Skyward, was just incredible, and even made My Top Ten Reads for 2018 List, so I have high hopes for the sequel.


10. Hollow Empire by Sam Hawke – 10 December 2019

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I really loved the first book in the Poison War series, City of Lies, which made two of my previous Top Ten Tuesday Lists, and I cannot wait to see where Hawke takes the series next.

I hope you enjoy this list.  Make sure to keep an eye on my blog for future reviews of all these books and let me know what you are looking forward to in the second half of 2019.

Waiting on Wednesday – Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

Welcome to my weekly segment, Waiting on Wednesday, where I look at upcoming books that I am planning to order and review in the next few months and which I think I will really enjoy.  Stay tuned to see reviews of these books when I get a copy of them.

Gideon the Ninth Cover

For this Waiting on Wednesday article, I check out a crazy, unique and extremely intriguing debut that is already getting a huge amount of interest: Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir. Gideon the Ninth is Muir’s debut book and it sounds like it will be a fantasy and science fiction hybrid novel focussing on a group of spacefaring necromancers as they battle for power. Gideon the Ninth is set to be released on 10 September 2019 and will be the first book in The Ninth House series, with two additional books in the series already planned.

Goodreads Synopsis:

The Emperor needs necromancers.

The Ninth Necromancer needs a swordswoman.

Gideon has a sword, some dirty magazines, and no more time for undead bullshit.

Tamsyn Muir’s Gideon the Ninth unveils a solar system of swordplay, cut-throat politics, and lesbian necromancers. Her characters leap off the page, as skillfully animated as necromantic skeletons. The result is a heart-pounding epic science fantasy.

Brought up by unfriendly, ossifying nuns, ancient retainers, and countless skeletons, Gideon is ready to abandon a life of servitude and an afterlife as a reanimated corpse. She packs up her sword, her shoes, and her dirty magazines, and prepares to launch her daring escape. But her childhood nemesis won’t set her free without a service.

Harrowhark Nonagesimus, Reverend Daughter of the Ninth House and bone witch extraordinaire, has been summoned into action. The Emperor has invited the heirs to each of his loyal Houses to a deadly trial of wits and skill. If Harrowhark succeeds she will be become an immortal, all-powerful servant of the Resurrection, but no necromancer can ascend without their cavalier. Without Gideon’s sword, Harrow will fail, and the Ninth House will die.

Of course, some things are better left dead.

I have to admit, this has to be one of the wildest and most interesting plot synopses that I have ever read. “Lesbian necromancers in space” is a pretty darn compelling plot hook for a book, and it definitely got my attention. The idea of the political intrigue and backstabbing of competing space necromancers really appeals to me, and I am sure it will make for a great story. Honestly, this book sounds like it is going to have an incredibly fun and over-the-top story, and I am extremely keen to check it out. I also really love the book’s cool cover, and the dead, gothic theme of it really stands out.

I have been seeing some early reviews of this book, and it sounds like some advanced copies have already been circulated to some other reviewers. These early analyses are very positive, and it sounds like a lot of people are really enjoying them. If you are curious for a sneak peek, the Tor website has the first nine chapters already up. I have checked out one of the chapters on there, and the bits I read were both intriguing and funny. Based on the small amount that I have already read, I know I am really going to like this book and I am looking forward to getting my own copy.

It looks like I am going to be having a lot of fun in September with Gideon the Ninth and I cannot wait to try out this exciting and creative sounding debut.