WWW Wednesday – 15 September 2021

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

The Riviera House by Natasha Lester (Trade Paperback)

The Riviera House Cover

I just started reading a fantastic historical drama with The Riviera House by Natasha Lester.  The Riviera House is a compelling and exciting multi-generational story that follows the attempts of some brave women as the attempt to safeguard France’s art from the Nazis.

 

Summer Knight by Jim Butcher (Audiobook)

Summer Knight Cover

I was in the mood for something fun to listen to, so I decided to head back to the awesome Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher.  After previously enjoying Storm Front, Fool Moon and Grave Peril, I knew I would have a great time with the fourth book in the series, Summer Knight.  This fourth book sees Dresden caught between two warring faerie courts and forces him to investigate the murder of one of their champions.  I am making some good progress with this book and should hopefully finish it off in the next few days.

What did you recently finish reading?

The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh (Trade Paperback)

The Devil's Advocate Cover

 

The Dark by Jeremy Robinson (Audiobook)

The Dark Cover

 

Star Wars: The High Republic: Tempest Runner by Cavan Scott (Audio Drama)

Star Wars - Tempest Runner Cover

 

The Gray Man by Mark Greaney (Audiobook)

The Gray Man Cover

 

Corporal Hitler’s Pistol by Tom Keneally (Trade Paperback)

Corporal Hitler's Pistol Cover

 

The Widow’s Follower by Anna Weatherly (Trade Paperback)

The Widow's Follower

What do you think you’ll read next?

The Wisdom of Crowds by Joe Abercrombie (Audiobook)

The Wisdom of Crowds Cover

 

 

That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh

The Devil's Advocate Cover

Publisher: Orion (Trade Paperback – 27 July 2021)

Series: Eddie Flynn – Book 6

Length: 403 pages

My Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Bestselling thriller author Steve Cavanagh returns with another exciting and over-the-top fun legal thriller, The Devil’s Advocate, an awesome read with a very entertaining plot.

Randal Korn is an evil man, a dangerous killer, and an unrepentant corrupting influence on everyone around him.  Unfortunately for the residents of Sunville County, Alabama, Randal Korn is also their District Attorney, who uses his skills and influence to get the legal system to commit his killings for him.  Known as the King of Death Row, Korn has sent more men to the electric chair than any other district attorney in US history, deriving great pleasure from every life his prosecutions have taken.  However, not all of Korn’s victims have been guilty, a fact that Korn knows and deeply relishes.

When a young woman, Skylar Edwards, is found brutally murdered in Buckstown, Alabama, the corrupt sheriff’s department quickly arrests the last person to see her alive, her innocent African American co-worker Andy Dubios.  After the racist cops quickly beat a confession out of him, Andy is set to stand trial with Korn prosecuting a seemingly airtight case.  With the entire town already convinced of his guilt and with no chance of a fair trial, Andy’s death looks certain, until Eddie Flynn arrives in town.

Hired after Andy’s previous lawyer goes missing, former conman turned brilliant New York lawyer Eddie Flynn heads down to Alabama with his team to try and save Andy’s life.  However, the moment he arrives, Eddie begins to understand just how stacked the deck is.  Thanks to Korn’s immense influence, the entire town is hostile to him, the police are refusing to cooperate, witnesses are threatened or arrested by the sheriff, the judge is already on the prosecutor’s side, and any potential juror will already believe that Andy is guilty.  To save his client’s life, Eddie will have to use every single trick he has to con the jury into finding Andy not guilty, but even that might not be enough.  Worse, it soon becomes apparent that the killing of Skylar Edwards was only the start.  A dangerous murderer still stalks Buckstown, killing whoever gets in their way to achieve their own sinister agenda, and their sights are now firmly set on Eddie.

This was a pretty awesome and wildly entertaining novel from the talented Steve Cavanagh.  A lawyer himself, Cavanagh burst onto the crime-fiction scene a few years ago with his debut novel, The Defence, the first book in his Eddie Flynn series.  There have since been several other Eddie Flynn books, each of which places the protagonist in a unique legal situation.  I have been meaning to read some of Cavanagh’s books for a while now due to the awesome sounding plot synopsis and I currently have a couple of his novels sitting on my shelf, waiting to be read.  Unfortunately, I have not had the chance yet, although I think I will have to make a bit of an effort after reading The Devil’s Advocate, which I was lucky enough to receive a little while ago.  The Devil’s Advocate was an outstanding and captivating novel and I swiftly got drawn into the exciting and amusing narrative.

The Devil’s Advocate has an awesome story to which is extremely addictive and enjoyable.  When I picked up this book, I initially intended only read around 50 pages in my first sitting, however, once I started I honestly could not put it down, and before I knew it I was halfway through and it was well past my bed time.  Cavanagh produces an extremely cool narrative that starts with an awesome scene that introduces the main antagonist and ensures that you will really hate him.  From then, Cavanagh quickly sets up the initial mystery, the introduction of the legal case, and the plot that brings the protagonist to Alabama.  The rest of the narrative neatly falls into place shortly after, with the full details of the case, the corruption of the main setting, and the massive injustice that is taking place, coming to light.  From there, the protagonists attempt to set up their case while facing sustained and deadly opposition from pretty much everyone.  While the initial focus is on the legal defence aspect of the thriller, the story quickly branches out into several captivating storylines, including an examination of the antagonist’s corrupting influence on the town, planned action from a white supremacist groups, attempts to run off or kill the protagonists, as well as mystery around who really killed Skylar.  All these separate storylines are really fascinating and come together with the plot’s central legal case to form an exceptionally fun and electrifying story.  The reader is constantly left guessing about what is going to happen next, especially with multiple red herrings and false reveals, and I ended up not predicting all the great twists that occurred.  While I did think that Cavanagh went a little too political with the overall message of the book, The Devil’s Advocate had an outstanding ending and I had an exceptional time getting through this thrilling story.

One of the best parts of this entire story is the outrageous and unfair legal case that the protagonists must attempt to win.  This case forms the centre of The Devil’s Advocate’s plot, with most of Eddie and his colleagues’ appearances focused on their upcoming legal battle.  Cavanagh really went out his way to create a truly unique and compelling set of legal circumstances for the protagonists to wade through, with the case so tightly sewn up against their innocent client before they even get there.  Despite this, the protagonist goes to work with a very effective, if unconventional, legal strategy that plays to the antagonist’s underhanded tactics.  The entire legal case soon devolves into crazy anarchy, with both sides doing outrageous actions to win, which Cavanagh writes up perfectly.  I found myself getting quite invested in the case, especially after witnessing several blatant examples of the prosecution’s corruption, and these terrible actions really got me rooting for the protagonist, who had some entertaining tricks of his own.  This all leads up to an excellent extended trial sequence, where the various strategies and manipulations in the first two-thirds of the novel come into play.  There are some brilliant and entertaining legal manoeuvrings featured here, with the protagonist initially focusing more on pissing off the prosecution and the judge rather than producing alternative evidence.  However, there are some great reveals and cross-examinations towards the end of the book, as Eddie has a very good go at dismantling the case.  The way it finally ends is pretty clever, and I really liked the way some of it was set up, even if it relied a little too much on a minor character’s conscience finally flaring.

Cavanagh also featured some great and entertaining characters in The Devil’s Advocate, with a combination of new characters and returning protagonists from the previous novels.  The author makes great use of multiple character perspectives throughout this novel, especially as it allows the reader to see the various sides of the battle for Buckstown’s soul.  Seeing the moves and counter-moves of the protagonists and antagonists enhances the excitement of the novel, especially as it shows the creation of several traps that could potentially destroy Eddie and his client.  Most of the characters featured in the novel are very entertaining, although I think in a few cases Cavanagh went a little over-the-top, with some of the villains being a bit cartoonish in their evilness.

The main character of this novel is series hero Eddie Flynn, the former conman who now works on impossible cases as a defence attorney.  Eddie was an awesome central protagonist, especially as his unique sense of justice and criminal background turns him into one of the most entertaining and likeable lawyers you are likely to ever meet.  I loved the very underhanded way in which he worked to win his case, and the variety of tricks and manipulations that he used were extremely fun to see in action, especially as it rattles the police antagonists and completely outrages the other lawyers and judges.  I loved his style in the courtroom scenes, especially as most of his appearances eventually end up with him thrown in jail for contempt (it is a pretty wise legal strategy).  Eddie has a very fun code in this novel, and I think that I will enjoy seeing the earlier novels in which he transitions from conman to lawyer.

Eddie is also supported by a fantastic team from his small law practice, each of whom get several chapters to themselves and who serve as great alternate characters who in some way overshadow the main protagonist.  These include his wise old mentor character, Harry; the younger lawyer, Kate; and the badass investigator, Bloch.  Each of them brings something fun and compelling to the overall story, and I liked the way that Cavanagh ensured that they all get their moment throughout The Devil’s Advocate.  I really enjoyed some of the great sub-storylines surrounding these three supporting protagonists.  Examples of this include Harry, a genuine silver fox with the ability to attract a certain type of older lady, who serves as the team’s heart and soul, although he’s not opposed to some improper legal tactics.  I also enjoyed Kate’s appearances as a secondary trial attorney, especially as she serves as a good alternate to the flashier Eddie, while also finding her feet in a murder case that has rattled her.  I personally enjoyed the gun-toting investigator Bloch the most, mainly because of her hard-assed attitude and inability to be intimidated by the various monsters lurking around town.  Bloch has some very intense and exciting scenes, and it was really entertaining to see her stare down rabid militiamen and crooked cops.  These protagonists end up forming an impressive and cohesive team, and it was a real joy to see them in action.

I also must highlight the outstanding villain of the story that was Randal Korn.  Korn is a truly evil and terrifying creation who is pretty much the direct opposite of the more heroic Eddie.  Cavanagh has clearly gone out of his way to create the most outrageously despicable antagonist he could, and it really works.  Korn, who apparently is a bit of a pastiche parody of five real-life American prosecutors who always seek the death penalty, is a man who became a lawyer solely so he would have a legal way to kill people.  The pleasure he receives from controlling people and ensuring that they die, even if they are innocent or undeserving, is terrifying, and it ensures that the character will go to extreme lengths to win his case.  The author does a fantastic job painting him as a despicable figure, including through several point of view chapter, and there are some interesting examinations about his psyche and his desires.  Having such an easily hated villain really draws the reader into the narrative, mainly because the reader cannot help but hope that he gets what is coming to him.  Despite that, I think Cavanagh went a little overboard in some places (the self-mutilation and the rotting smell are a bit much), and the whole soulless creature angle is layered on a bit too thickly.  Still, the author achieved what he wanted to with this antagonist, and I had a wonderful time hating this character from start to finish.

The final point-of-view character that I want to mention is the mysterious figure known as the Pastor.  The Pastor is another antagonist of this novel whose identity is kept hidden from the reader for much of the book.  This is mainly because he is the real killer of Skylar Edwards, whose death was part of an elaborate plan.  The Pastor is another great villain for this novel, due to his crazed personality, murderous tendencies and horrendous motivations for his crimes.  I think that Cavanagh did a great job utilising this second villain in his novel, and I liked the tandem usage he had with Korn.  I was especially impressed with the clever mystery that the author had surrounding his identity, which was kept hidden right till the very end.  It took me longer than I expected to work out who the Pastor was, thanks to some clever misdirects from the author, but the eventual reveal was extremely good and helped tie the entire story together.  Readers will have a lot of fun trying to work out who this character is, and I really enjoyed the extra villainy that they brought to the table.

The fantastic Steve Cavanagh has once again produced a captivating and intense legal thriller with The Devil’s Advocate.  This latest Eddie Flynn thriller was an amazing ball of crazy fun that I powered through in two sustained reading sessions.  With some over-the-top characters, a clever legal case, and an exciting overarching conspiracy, The Devil’s Advocate proved to be next to impossible to turn down and is really worth checking out.  I will definitely be going back and reading some of Cavanagh’s earlier books, and I look forward to seeing what insane scenarios he comes up with in the future.

WWW Wednesday – 8 September 2021

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh (Trade Paperback)

The Devil's Advocate Cover

I was in the mood for a fun and exciting novel so I thought I would check out my very first Steven Cavanagh legal thriller, and boy am I glad that I did.  Cavanagh’s latest novel, The Devil’s Advocate, is an incredibly fun courtroom read that pits a former conman turned defence attorney against an insane prosecutor who delights in sending innocent people to death row.  Throw in an insanely biased town, some crazy shenanigans, and a group of racist manipulators and you have one hell of a novel.  I only just started The Devil’s Advocate today but I am already hooked, and I powered through the first 100 pages in no time at all.  I cannot wait to see how this story turns out and it should be an amazing amount of fun.

 

The Dark by Jeremy Robinson (Audiobook)

The Dark Cover

I have several big upcoming audiobook releases on the horizon, but I decided to make a little time this week to listen to something a little different.  Jeremy Robinson is an author who I have been curious about for a while, especially as I love how awesome several of his series sound.  However, I thought a good way to get an idea of his writing style and creativity would be to listen to a copy of his latest novel, The Dark, which was voiced by a very talented audiobook narrator whose work I have enjoyed in the past.  I honestly was not too sure what to expect when I started listening to The Dark, but so far I have been deeply impressed with it.  The Dark follows a group of survivors, including an unusual and entertaining protagonist, as they attempt to survive an apocalyptical event of biblical proportions.  This is an amazing horror novel that will probably end up getting a five-star rating from me.

What did you recently finish reading?

The Councillor by E. J. Beaton (Hardcover)

The Councillor Cover

 

Star Wars: The High Republic: Out of the Shadows by Justina Ireland (Audiobook)

Star Wars - Out of the Shadows Cover

What do you think you’ll read next?

Corporal Hitler’s Pistol by Tom Keneally (Trade Paperback)

Corporal Hitler's Pistol Cover

 

 

That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

Book Haul – 22 August 2021

I have had a pretty awesome week book-wise, having been lucky enough to receive several amazing novels that I am quite excited to read.  I have been waiting for several of these novels for some time now and I have very high hopes for all of them.

The Pariah by Anthony Ryan

The Pariah Cover

The first book on this list is one of the most anticipated fantasy releases of 2021, The Pariah by Anthony Ryan.  Ryan is a highly regarded fantasy author who has written some incredible sounding novels over the last few years, and his latest one, The Pariah looks to be particularly awesome.  The first entry in a whole new series, The Pariah will follow a notorious outlaw who goes a deadly mission of vengeance.  This book has so much potential and it is likely to be one of the best books of the year.

 

The Dying Squad by Adam Simcox

The Dying Squad Cover

I was pretty pleased to receive the cool new debut, The Dying Squad by Adam Simcox.  The Dying Squad is interesting and fun read that follows a recently deceased detective who must solve his own murder in order to save his soul from purgatory.  I am very keen to see how this new novel turns out and I think it will be a great read.

 

The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh 

The Devil's Advocate Cover

The master of the twisty legal thriller, Steve Cavanagh, returns with another cool and unique case.  His latest book, The Devil’s Advocate, sees his conman lawyer protagonist, Eddie Flynn, attempt to save an innocent man accused of murder from a deadly prosecutor who thrives on death sentence cases.  This should be a truly awesome read, and I cannot wait to see all the cool twists and turns Cavanagh includes.

 

Hostage by Clare Mackintosh

Hostage Cover

The thrillers keep on rolling in, as I was also lucky enough to get a copy of the new Clare Mackintosh novel, Hostage.  This intriguing novel follows a flight attendant aboard a major international flight who finds her daughter held hostage and must bring down the plane in order to save her.  I am very interested in seeing how this book turns out, and it should be a great read.

 

Rabbit Hole by Mark Billingham

Rabbit Hole Cover

I have to say that I really love the premise of this next cool book I have received, Rabbit Hole by Mark Billingham.  This novel features a murder in a secure ward, where all the patients and staff are considered suspects, and the protagonist is a former cop turned mental patient, who may have committed the crime herself.  This book sounds extremely dark and I am expecting a very intense psychological thriller/mystery.

 

Rogue Asset by Andy McDermott

Rogue Asset Cover

Get ready for an intense thrill ride with the latest Alex Reeve novel by Andy McDermott, Rogue Asset.  This new Alex Reeve novel follows the titular rogue spy as he once again finds himself dragged into an deadly conspiracy where everyone wants to kill him.  I look forward to checking this book out and I imagine it is going to be an absolute blast to get through.

 

The Swift and the Harrier by Minette Walters

The Swift and the Harrier Cover

Bestselling historical fiction author, Minette Walters returns with a brand new historical epic, The Swift and the Harrier.  This latest book is set in the English Civil War and looks set to portray a dark and dramatic tale of love and loss on the battlefield.  I am rather intrigued by this new release, and it should be quite a compelling and moving read.

 

Corporal Hitler’s Pistol by Tom Keneally

Corporal Hitler's Pistol Cover

The final book I have received is the rather unique and interesting Australian historical fiction novel, Corporal Hitler’s Pistol.  Written by bestselling Australian author Tom Keneally, whose previous work Schindler’s Ark, was adapted into the iconic film, Schindler’s List.  His latest book is set in 1933 Kempsey, New South Wales, and features a murder that was committed using the Luger formerly owned by Hitler during World War I.  This looks to be one of the most unique historical fiction reads of 2021, and I am extremely curious to see what happens in it.

 

Well that’s the end of this latest Book Haul post.  As you can see I have quite a bit of reading to do at the moment thanks to all these awesome books that have come in.  Let me know which of the above you are most interested in and make sure to check back in a few weeks to see my reviews of them.

Top Ten Tuesday – Books I Meant to Read in 2020 but Didn’t Get To

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that currently resides at The Artsy Reader Girl and features bloggers sharing lists on various book topics.  For this week’s topic, Top Ten Tuesday participants need to list the books they most regret not reading in 2020.  I ended up having an outstanding reading year in 2020, managing to get through a solid collection of cool new releases and older novels, most of which proved to be amazing and entertaining reads.  However, no matter how hard one tries, there are always a couple of books each year that I did not get a chance to read, either due to time constraints, lack of access or from being overwhelmed with other books that I really wanted to read.  As a result, this is a list that is rather tinged with regret, as each book I plan to mention below is one that I really wish I had taken the time to read.

In order to complete this list, I pulled together some of the more interesting and compelling sounding novels that I did not get a chance to read in the last year.  Each entry was released last year and while I knew that they were coming out, I did not get a chance to read any of them.  In many cases I have these books sitting on my shelf at this moment, silently and constantly judging me, and I think I will have to try and read them to stop their bookish glares.  I was eventually able to cull my list of regret down to 10 entries with an honourable mentions section.  The final list is an interesting collection of books from across the genres and includes a couple of big 2020 releases I did not get a chance to look at.

 

Honourable Mentions:

 

Sons of Rome by Gordon Doherty and Simon Turney

Sons of Rome Cover

 

Black Canary: Breaking Silence by Alexandra Monir

Black Canary - Breaking Silence Cover

I only found out about this book a few days ago, and I had no idea that it was coming out in advance of the end of 2020.  This is the fifth novel in the DC Icons young adult fiction series, a fantastic series that sets teenage versions of some of the biggest DC superheroes on some compelling standalone adventures (check out my reviews for Catwoman: Soulstealer and Superman: Dawnbreaker).  Black Canary: Breaking Silence sounds particularly good as it features a teenage Black Canary in a dystopian future Gotham City ruled over by the tyrannical Court of Owls, where women have no rights.  I am really keen to check this book out and I am planning to grab it in the next few weeks.  While this is a really cool sounding novel, I decided to leave this book on my Honourable Mentions section because it was only released on 29 December 2020, and even if I had known it was coming out I would have been hard pressed to read it last year anyway.  Because of that, I may try to consider Breaking Silence as a 2021 novel, but I am still a tad annoyed I did not get a chance to read it last year.

 

Fifty-Fifty by Steve Cavanagh

Fifty-Fifty Cover

 

Providence by Max Barry

Providence Cover

 

Top Ten List:


War Lord
by Bernard Cornwell

War_Lord_cover.PNG

 

Either Side of Midnight by Benjamin Stevenson

Either Side of Midnight Cover

 

The Obsidian Tower by Melissa Caruso

The Obsidian Tower Cover

 

The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton

The Devil and the Dark Water Cover

 

Shorefall by Robert Jackson Bennett

Shorefall Cover

 

The Sandman by Neil Gaiman and Dirk Maggs

The Sandman

This next entry is for the full cast The Sandman audio drama that was released in the second half of 2020.  I currently have a copy of this cool-sounding audio drama loaded up on my phone and I hope to listen to it soon, I have just been a bit overwhelmed with audiobooks in the last few months.  This audio drama features an amazing collection of celebrities who are helping to bring Neil Gaiman’s iconic The Sandman comic to life in a new format.  I have heard some amazing things about both the comic and the audio drama and I cannot wait to see how this adaptation turns out.

 

The Bluffs by Kyle Perry

The Bluffs Cover

The Bluffs is a grim and dark Australian crime fiction novel that came out a few months ago.  The debut novel of Australian author Kyle Perry, The Bluffs sounds like a fantastic read set deep within the wild Tasmanian bush, and I hope to get a chance to read it soon.

 

Gallowglass by S. J. Morden

Gallowglass Cover

 

The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart

The Bone Shard Daughter Cover

This is another debut that I am particularly sorry I have not read yet.  The Bone Shard Daughter is a very cool-sounding fantasy novel by Andrea Stewart that deals with bone magic and the fate of a nation.  I have heard some very impressive things about The Bone Shard Daughter and I will need to read it in the first half of the year in order to grab any potential sequels coming out in 2021.

 

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse

Black Sun Cover

The final entry on my list is Black Sun by acclaimed author Rebecca Roanhorse.  Roanhorse has released a lot of interesting novels in the last few years, and while I did enjoy her Star Wars tie-in novel, Resistance Reborn, I have not had the chance to read any of her original series.  I was hoping to check out her 2020 release, Black Sun, which served as the first entry in a new series, but alas I failed to do so.  This is a real shame, as Black Sun was another Roanhorse novel that got an immense amount of praise from reviewers.  I must try and read this one soon as I am sure it is going to be an epic and outstanding read.



Well, that is the end of my latest list and it looks like I have a lot catch-up reading to do if I am going to make a dent in it.  There are some truly amazing-sounding novels on this list and I fully intend to get through all of them at some point, although with all the outstanding books coming out in 2021, it might take me a little time.  In the meantime, let me know what books you most regret not reading in 2020 in the comments below.

 

Book Haul – 17 February 2020

It has been another great couple of weeks for me when it comes to receiving books.  I have been lucky enough to receive several fantastic novels from my local publishers, including a couple of reads I was really looking forward to.  Each of the books below has a lot of potential and I am excited to read each and every one of them.

False Value by Ben Aaronovitch

False Value Cover

Now this is a book that I have been wanting to check out for over a year, especially after I had such an amazing time reading the previous book in the Rivers of London series, Lies Sleeping.  I included this book on both my Top Ten Most Anticipated Book Releases for the First Half of 2020 list and my Top Ten Books I Predict will be Five Star Reads list, so you can imagine just how keen I am to check it out.  I have actually already started reading it, and so far it is pretty darn incredible. 

The Warsaw Protocol by Steve Berry

The Warsaw Protocol Cover

Another book I have really been keen to get a copy of.  The Warsaw Protocol is the latest novel in the Cotton Malone series of thrillers, which focus on fascinating historical conspiracies.  I have actually already finished reading this book and I will hopefully get a review for it up in the next day or so.

Death in the Ladies Goddess Club by Julian Leatherdale

Death in the Ladies Goddess Club Cover

This is an interesting sounding Australian historical murder mystery that I am hoping to check out in the next couple of weeks.

The Wolf of Oren-Yaro by K. S. Villoso

The Wolf of Oren-Yaro Cover

This is a cool fantasy novel that I am looking forward to reading.  Pretty much all you need to know about this book is that it has an intriguing concept and it is part of a series called Chronicles of the Bitch Queen.  Needless to say, I am expecting something really fun out of this book and it should be good.

Amnesty by Aravind Adiga

Amnesty Cover

Another compelling sounding Australian novel, Amnesty is probably going to get very heavy as it deals with an illegal immigrant living in Australia.  I am actually really curious about this one and I am intrigued about how it is going to turn out.

Fifty-Fifty by Steve Cavanagh

Fifty-Fifty Cover

Two women on trial for the same murder, one is innocent, one is guilty. Now that is a pretty cool concept and I for one, really want to know what the solution is.

The Holdout by Graham Moore

The Holdout Cover

The final book in this haul is The Holdout by Graham Moore.  I loved the sound of this book’s fantastic plot synopsis last year and have been looking forward to reading it ever since. A combination legal drama and murder mystery from the writer of The Imitation Game, this is something that I have to check out!
That’s it for this latest book haul.  I am still expecting a few amazing books in the next couple of weeks, but in the mean time I better start making some progress reading and reviewing the books I already have.