To Kill a Man by Sam Bourne

To Kill a Man Cover

Publisher: Quercus (Trade Paperback – 19 March 2020)

Series: Maggie Costello – Book Five

Length: 438 pages

My Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Acclaimed thriller writer Sam Bourne delivers another captivating and intriguing novel about the dark side of American politics in his latest clever and exhilarating release, To Kill a Man.

In Washington DC, a woman is brutally assaulted in her own home by a masked intruder. Defending herself, she manages to kill her assailant, leaving him dead on the floor. While it seems to be a simple case of self-defence, the victim is no ordinary woman; instead, she is Natasha Winthrop, a high-flying lawyer whose highly publicised work during a House intelligence committee has many people wanting her to run for President of the United States.

As the events of this case are torn apart by the media, politicians and the general public, certain inconsistencies in Winthrop’s story emerge, and the police start to investigate the possibility that Winthrop knew her attacker and that she arranged the entire situation. With a hostile press and her potential political opponents swarming all around her, Winthrop calls in Maggie Costello, Washington’s top political troubleshooter for help.

Maggie eagerly takes on the case and quickly finds herself helping a woman at the centre of one of America’s most controversial and divisive news stories. While the country divides over whether Winthrop is innocent or guilty, and several violent retaliatory attacks against sexual offenders occur around the globe, Maggie is determined to find something that will prove her client’s innocence and allow her to keep her political future intact. However, the further Maggie digs, the more inconsistencies and surprises she uncovers. Who is Natasha Winthrop really, and what connections did she have to the man who attacked her? As the political sharks circle and the deadline for Winthrop’s announcement as a potential candidate gets closer, Maggie attempts to uncover the truth before it is too late. But what will Maggie do when the entire shocking truth comes to the surface?

To Kill a Man is an impressive and captivating political thriller from Sam Bourne, the nom de plume of British journalist Jonathan Saul Freedman, who started writing thrillers back in 2006 with his debut novel, The Righteous Men. He has since gone on to write eight additional thrillers, five of which, including To Kill a Man, have featured Maggie Costello as their protagonist. I have been meaning to read some of Bourne’s novels for a couple of years now, ever since I saw the awesome-sounding synopsis for his 2018 release, To Kill the President. While I did not get a chance to read that book back then, I have been keeping an eye on Bourne’s recent releases, and when I received a copy of To Kill a Man I quickly jumped at the chance to read it. What I found was a cool and intriguing novel with a compelling and complex plot that I had an outstanding time reading.

Bourne has come up with a rather intriguing story for To Kill a Man that sends the reader through a twisted political thriller filled with all manner of surprises and revelations that totally keeps them guessing. I honestly had a hard time putting this book down as I quickly became engrossed in this fantastic story, and every new reveal kept me more and more hooked right up until the very end, where there was one final revelation that will keep a reader thinking and eager to check out the next Bourne book. The entire story is rather clever, and I really liked how Bourne showed the plot from a variety of different perspectives around the world, from Maggie Costello and Natasha Winthrop, to the media, the police, Winthrop’s political opponents and their team, as well as several other people who are affected by the events of the narrative. This use of multiple point-of-view characters, even if they have only short appearances, makes for a more complete story, and I quite liked seeing how fictional members of the public perceived the events going on. While connected to the events of the previous Maggie Costello books, To Kill a Man is essentially a standalone novel, and no prior knowledge of any of Bourne’s other novels are required to enjoy this thrilling plot. I really enjoyed where Bourne took this great story, and this turned into a rather captivating thriller.

One part of the book that I particularly liked was the author’s exploration of America’s current political system, and how some of the events of this novel’s plot would play out in a modern effort to become president. As the main plot of To Kill a Man progresses, there are several scenes that feature both Maggie Costello and members of the election team of Winthrop’s main potential rival discussing the various pros and cons of someone in her position running and attempting to game plan how to defeat her if she did run. This was a rather intriguing aspect of the book, and Bourne really did not pull any punches when it comes to his portrayal of just how weird and depressing modern-day politics in America really is. The various political discussions show a real lack of decency and ethics around modern politicians, and there were multiple mentions of how a certain recent election changed all the rules of politics, making everything so much dirtier. The various news stories that followed such an event also had a rather depressing reality to them, especially as the various biases of certain networks and correspondents were made plain, and do not get me started on the various Twitter discussions that were also occurring. All of this works itself into the main story rather well, and some of the revelations that Maggie was able to uncover have some very real and significant real-world counterparts, some of which have not been solved as well in the real world as they were in this somewhat exaggerated thriller. I think all these political inclusions were a terrific part of the book and they really helped to enhance the potential reality of the story and make the story feel a bit more relatable to anyone who follows modern American politics.

To Kill a Man also featured an interesting and topical discussion about the scourge of sexual assaults and harassment that are occurring throughout the world. The main plot of this book follows in the aftermath of a sexual assault against a woman in which the victim fought back and killed her attacker. This results in a huge number of discussions from the characters featured in the novel, as they all try to work out the ethics of her actions in defending herself, and the perceptions of these actions from a variety of people makes for an intriguing aspect of the book, and feeds in well to the political aspects of the story. This also leads to some deep and powerful discussions about sexual assault in America (and the world), the impact that it has on people and the mostly muted response from the public and authorities. This sentiment is enforced by several scenes that show snapshots of women being assaulted and sexually harassed across the world that run throughout the course of the book. While the inclusion of these scenes does appear a little random at times, it ties in well with the main story and the overarching conspiracy that is being explored in the central part of the book. Bourne makes sure to show off the full and terrible effect of these actions, and many of these may prove to be a little distressing to some readers, although I appreciate that he was attempting to get across just how damaging such experiences can be for the victims. I also liked his subsequent inclusion of members of the extreme male right wing who were being used as weapons against some of the female characters in the book, which made for an interesting if exasperating (as in: why do people like this exist in the real world) addition to the story. This discussion about sexual crimes in the world today proved to be a rather powerful and visible part of the book’s plot that I felt worked well within the context of the thriller storyline.

To Kill a Man is an excellent new thriller from Sam Bourne, who produces a clever and layered narrative that really hooks the reader with its compelling twists, intriguing political elements and Bourne’s in-your-face examination of sexual crimes and how they are perceived in a modern society. To Kill a Man comes highly recommended, and I look forward to reading more of Bourne’s fantastic thrillers in the future.

WWW Wednesday – 29 April 2020

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

Jerusalem, Salvatore Covers

Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem by Nick Held (Trade Paperback)

This is an interesting and emotionally charged novel from debuting Australian author Nick Held that follows the life of a Jewish family in Czernowitz during World War II.  I have made a good amount of progress into this novel, and it is quite a powerful read so far.

Song of the Risen God by R. A. Salvatore (Audiobook)

The latest novel from one of my favourite authors, R. A. Salvatore, Song of the Risen God is the sequel to Reckoning of Fallen Gods and the final book in The Coven series.  I only just started this audiobook, and it is proving to be an exciting and action packed fantasy novel.

What did you recently finish reading?

To Kill a Man, The Unsettling Stars Covers

To Kill a Man by Sam Bourne (Trade Paperback)

Star Trek: The Unsettling Stars by Alan Dean Foster (Audiobook)

What do you think you’ll read next?

The Girl and the Stars
by Mark Lawrence (Trade Paperback)

The Girl and the Stars Cover

 
That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

Book Haul – 27 April 2020

It has been a good couple of weeks for me book wise, as I have been lucky enough to receive a bunch of fantastic books which I am really looking forward to reading.  I have actually ended up with quite an impressive collection of books, and I have been looking forward to checking out a bunch of them for a while now.

 

To Kill a Man by Sam Bourne

To Kill a Man Cover

To Kill a Man is the latest exciting political thriller from bestselling author Sam Bourne, whose work I have been meaning to check out for a while.  I have actually already read To Kill a Man and it is a very good read and I loved how the story turned out.  I am working on a review for it now and will hopefully post it up soon.

Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem by Rick Held

Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem Cover

This is a powerful and captivating World War II historical drama from debuting Australian author Rick Held.  I just started reading Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem today and so far I am really enjoying this well-written and haunting novel.

Aurora Burning by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Aurora Burning Cover

This is a book that I have been looking forward to for a whileAurora Burning is the fantastic sounding second book in the Aurora Cycle, a thrilling young adult science fiction series from Australian writing duo Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff.  I loved the first book in this series, Aurora Rising, last year, and I cannot wait to read the sequel.

The Last Emperox by John Scalzi

The Last Emperox Covers

The Last Emperox is an intriguing science fiction novel from John Scalzi, which serves as the third and final book in The Interdependency trilogy.  I am a tad conflicted about reading this book as I haven’t had a chance to check out the first two novels in this series first.  However, I have heard really good things about Scalzi’s books in the past, so I think I’ll give it a go.

The Girl and the Stars by Mark Lawrence

The Girl and the Stars Cover

Now this is one that I am really excited to read.  The Girl and the Stars is easily one of the most anticipated fantasy novels of 2020, and I am rather glad I managed to get a copy of it.  I have been meaning to read some of Lawrence’s books for some time now, as each of his prior novels sounds pretty darn amazing, and have received a lot of praise in the past.  As a result, I am rather keen to check out The Girl and the Stars, which is the first book in a brand new series from Lawrence.  It is apparently set in the same universe as The Book of the Ancestors series, and I am hoping that my first introduction to Lawrence’s work will lead me to check out some of his prior work.

Monstrous Heart by Claire McKenna

Monstrous Heart Cover

The final book on this list is Monstrous Heart by Australian author Claire McKenna.  This is an interesting sounding fantasy debut that could prove to be really good and which I am looking forward to finding out more about.

 

Well that’s the end of my latest book haul post.  Let me know which books on this list you are most excited to read and stay tuned for my upcoming reviews of each of these fantastic books.

WWW Wednesday – 22 April 2020

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

To Kill a Man, The Unsettling Stars Covers

To Kill a Man by Sam Bourne (Trade Paperback)

I have been meaning to read some of Sam Bourne’s stuff for a couple of years now, but never quite had the time.  So when I was lucky enough to receive a copy of his latest book, To Kill a Man, earlier this week, I jumped at the chance and started reading it.  I am about halfway through at the moment, and so far I am finding it to be a fantastic and clever political thriller.

Star Trek: The Unsettling Stars by Alan Dean Foster (Audiobook)

I’ve been really getting into Star Trek extended fiction over the last year, so it didn’t take make to convince me to look at the latest Star Trek book to come out.  The Unsettling Stars is set in the alternate timeline that the 2008 Star Trek film created and follows the young crew of the Enterprise right after the events of the movie.  I am really enjoying this audiobook, and it has an intriguing story to it.


What did you recently finish reading?

Gathering Dark by Candice Fox (Trade Paperback)

Gathering Dark Cover


House of Earth and Blood
by Sarah J. Maas (Audiobook)

House of Earth and Blood Cover
Lords of the Sith by Paul S. Kemp (Audiobook)

Lords of the Sith Cover


What do you think you’ll read next?


Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem
by Rick Held (Trade Paperback)

Night Lessons in Little Jerusalem Cover

 

That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

Book Haul – 15 February 2019

I have had a very good couple of days in the book department, receiving several very cool novels that I cannot wait to read.  Hoping to get to each of these in the next couple of weeks.

The Raven Tower by Ann Leckie

The Raven Tower Cover

Particularly excited for this one as it previously featured in one of my Waiting on Wednesday segments.

Mission Critical by Mark Greaney

Mission Critical Cover.jpg

To Kill the Truth by Sam Bourne

To Kill the Truth Cover.jpg

How We Disappeared by Jing-Jing Lee

How We Disappeared Cover.jpg

Imprison the Sky by A. C. Gaughen

Imprison the Sky Cover.jpg

We Are Blood And Thunder by Kesia Lupo

We are Blood and Thunder Cover.jpg