WWW Wednesday – 17 July 2019

I’ve seen a few bloggers I follow participate in WWW Wednesday recently and I thought it would be an interesting and fun new meme to take part in. WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

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Star Wars: Thrawn: Treason by Timothy Zahn (trade paperback).
I am about halfway through this book at the moment and it is pretty awesome. I loved the first two books in this series, Thrawn and Alliances, and Treason looks like it will do an amazing job finishing it off.

King of Assassins by R. J. Barker (audiobook).
I am finally getting around to reading another book on my Top Ten Books I Wish I Read in 2018 list by checking out the audiobook version of King of Assassins. I’m one-third through this audiobook at the moment and I am really enjoying it.

What did you recently finish reading?

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The Kremlin Strike by Dale Brown

Nothing Ventured by Jeffrey Archer

A Capitol Death by Lindsey Davis (review to follow soon)

What do you think you’ll read next?

I am not entirely sure. I have a massive pile of books sitting at home at the moment and I want to read all of them, but for the sake of this question I have narrowed the list down to the top five I am currently considering:

Star Trek: The Captain’s Oath by Christopher L. Bennett

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Angel Mage by Garth Nix

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Guardian of the Empire by Kylie Chan

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The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind by Jackson Ford

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The Lost Ten by Harry Sidebottom

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I honestly have no idea which one I am going to read next; they all sound pretty epic. What would you like to see a review of the most? This selection is likely to change at any moment for a variety of reasons, so don’t be surprised if the next book I end up reading is something extremely different.

I hope you enjoyed my first foray into WWW Wednesday; I know I did. I am planning to do this regularly from now on and I look forward to seeing what you think about the books I reading or planning to read and review in the near future.

Nothing Ventured by Jeffrey Archer

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Publisher: Macmillan (Trade Paperback – 10 September 2019)

Series: William Warwick series – Book 1

Length: 323 pages

My Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

One of the biggest names in modern fiction, Jeffrey Archer, returns with Nothing Ventured, an intriguing piece of historical crime fiction that starts up his brand-new William Warwick series.

William Warwick, son of a respected London defence attorney, has always dreamed of becoming a detective in the London Metropolitan Police Force. Despite the opposition of his father, William enrols as a trainee police officer at the start of the 1980s after finishing university. Armed with determination, sharp observation skills, an education in fine art and a can-do spirit, William is unaware of the adventures in store for him.

After quickly making the rank of detective constable, William is assigned to Scotland Yard’s Arts and Antiquities squad. While also investigating of a series of different art crimes and frauds across London, the squad is mainly concerned with capturing Miles Faulkner, a criminal mastermind responsible for the thefts and forgeries of some of the most expensive art in England. All previous attempts to capture Faulkner have failed miserably, as the criminal is always two steps ahead of the police.

As William becomes more and more involved in investigating the various crimes Faulkner is organising, he makes a crucial breakthrough when he befriends Faulkner’s wife, Christina. Christina is willing to return a valuable stolen Rembrandt from Faulkner’s personal collection in return for help from the police. Can Christina be trusted, or will Faulkner once again evade justice and continue his dastardly schemes? In addition, what happens when William falls head over heels in love with Beth, a research assistant at the museum the Rembrandt was stolen from, whose family secrets may drive a terrible wedge between her and William?

I have mentioned before how Jeffrey Archer, or the Lord Archer of Weston-super-Mare as a Member of the British House of Lords, is one of the more colourful professional novelists in the world today. Archer has produced over 30 diverse books since 1976, including several standalone novels, a bestselling long-running series, several collections of short stories, three plays, three non-fiction books about his time spent in prison, and four children’s books. I have read several of his books in the past, although I only have his 2018 book, Heads you Win, currently reviewed on my blog at the moment.

Nothing Ventured is a fantastic new novel from Archer and is the first book in a planned eight-part William Warwick crime fiction series. The William Warwick series actually has a very interesting origin, as William Warwick served as the protagonist of a fictional series of books written by the main character in Archer’s most iconic series, the Clifton Chronicles, Harry Clifton. Following the end of the Clifton Chronicles in 2016 and several requests from his fans to expand on the adventures of Warwick, Archer started on this series. The William Warwick series will examine the career of its titular character and show the various cases he investigates that helped him to become a great detective.

This series is off to a good start with Nothing Ventured, as Archer creates a compelling and enjoyable read that does a fantastic job introducing the readers to his new protagonist and showing the early days of his police career. Archer has always excelled at creating historical fiction narratives that focus on the lives of specific characters, and Nothing Ventured is no exception. Within this book, the reader gets a great idea of the character of Warwick and sees the struggles and early influences that drive him to become a successful police detective. The reader is also introduced to a bevy of interesting side characters, many of whom are set up to be major friends, colleagues, love interests or antagonists of Warwick through the future books of the series. Overall, Archer does a superb job setting up his overarching series in Nothing Ventured, and the intriguing mysteries explored within, as well as the introduction of a likeable new protagonist, should ensure readers will check out future instalments of this series.

One of the most intriguing aspects about Nothing Ventured was the focus on the artistic world and the subsequent fraud or theft that accompanies it. At the start of the book, the protagonist studies art history at university and subsequently develops a life-long love for the artistic greats. This appreciation of art becomes an important part of his future career, as it helps him join the Arts and Antiquities squad. Throughout the course of Nothing Ventured, Warwick and his colleagues investigate a number of different instances of art fraud, including forgeries of famous works, fraudulent signatures of historical figures and the forging of fake antique coins, among several other interesting examples. I thought that this was an absolutely fascinating focus for this book, and I really enjoyed reading about all the different ways art fraud could be committed. It also allowed for a number of unique and compelling mysteries, and readers will enjoy seeing the diverse outcomes that result from these cases. I also enjoyed the various discussions about art that permeated the book’s narrative. Archer is obviously very passionate and knowledgeable about classic artworks and antiquities, and this shines through in his writing. I am hoping that this focus on art will continue in future books of the William Warwick series, as it really helped set this book apart from some other historical mystery series.

The focus on the art world in Nothing Ventured also allowed Archer to introduce a great antagonist in the form of Miles Faulkner. Faulkner is a criminal mastermind who specialises in crimes involving art and is the bane of the Arts and Antiquities squad. Faulkner is a great gentleman-thief character, who is in many ways quite similar to Warwick, especially when it comes to his love and appreciation of artistic works. However, unlike Warwick, he uses his knowledge for his own benefit and is a fantastic master criminal. I really enjoyed the various ways that Faulkner was able to outsmart the police in this book, and he proved to be a worthy opponent to Warwick and his colleagues. The reveal of the true depths of Faulkner’s intelligence and deviousness in the last sentence of the book is masterfully done and Archer is clearly setting the character up as one of the major antagonists of this series. I look forward to seeing him return in future entries in this series, and I am sure he will continue to be a great villain.

Readers should also keep an eye out for the chapters in which Archer splits the focus between two separate events occurring at the exact same time. This is done a couple of times throughout the course of the book, and these split chapters are a lot of fun to read. They are mostly done to highlight the differences between two similar events happening in different areas; for example, showing two different police operations occurring at the same time, or two unrelated court cases with implications for the protagonist that are running in separate court rooms. The inclusion of these simultaneous events was done really cleverly in places, and it resulted in a couple of amazing and compelling chapters which I felt were some of the book’s best scenes. I hope that Archer continues to utilise this writing technique in the future books of this series, as it was a true highlight of Nothing Ventured.

Jeffrey Archer has once again created a thrilling and intriguing novel that focuses on the life of an English protagonist in a historical fiction setting. Nothing Ventured is the compelling first instalment of a crime fiction series with some real potential. Within this first book of the William Warwick series, Archer has come up with an intriguing life story to follow, introducing some great characters and producing some captivating mysteries and criminals that readers will love to unravel in future books. The massive planned William Warwick series should ensure Archer remains one of the bestselling historical fiction authors for the next eight years, and I look forward to seeing how the career and life of the titular main character progresses in the next instalment of the series.

Book Haul – 26 June 2019

I managed to get a pretty interesting haul of books in the last week and a half, and figured it was time to share before I get too distracted by the next batch of books I’m hoping to get.  The latest haul is a really cool mixture of books, and I am really keen to check them all out when I get a chance.

A Capitol Death by Lindsey Davis

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I have been looking forward to this one for a few months and it is the only book on this list I spent some money on.  Given how much I loved Pandora’s Boy though, I know I’m going to enjoy this latest book in the Flavia Albia series.

The Need by Helen Phillips

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One of the more unusual books I got this week, it sounds like the story looks at alternate realities which could be cool.

The Bastille Spy by C. S. Quinn

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This one sounds like a pretty awesome historical fiction novel and it pretty high up on my to-read list at the moment.

Nothing Ventured by Jeffrey Archer

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I was really happy to get a copy of the upcoming Jeffrey Archer book Nothing Ventured.  His last book, Heads You Win, was a great read and this new book looks really interesting.

The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind by Jackson Ford

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That title alone should explain why I want to read this book.

To Calais, In Ordinary Time by James Meek

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Set during a chaotic period of history, this looks like it will be a powerful historical drama and could be a great read.

 

Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

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I only just got this book today, but I am really keen to check it out.  It sounds like a pretty cool young adult fantasy novel and I am very much looking forward to reading it.