Top Ten Tuesday – Books With a Unit of Time in the Title

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme that currently resides at The Artsy Reader Girl and features bloggers sharing lists on various book topics.  For this latest Top Ten Tuesday, participants are required to list their favourite books with a unit of time in the title, such as seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, seasons, years, centuries, eternity, etc. 

This was a rather interesting list topic in the same vein as several other recent lists I’ve done that containing certain types of words in the title including colours, adjectives, character names and numbers.  I usually have a pretty easy time pulling these lists together as I have read a bunch of books with these items in the titles.  However, I really struggled with this list as it turns out authors use units of time a lot less in titles than you’d expect.  I was barely able to find a full 10 items for this specific list and that was after I extended my criteria to include seasons (I originally wasn’t planning to feature them).  Still, I was eventually able to get a descent list together, even though it lacks my customary honourable mentions section.  I am pretty happy with how it all came together so let us see what books I was able to scrounge together.

Top Ten Tuesday:

Day of the Caesars by Simon Scarrow

Day of the Caesars Cover

 

The Dark Hours by Michael Connelly

The Dark Hours Cover 2

 

One Minute Out by Mark Greaney

One Minute Out Cover

 

The Third Day, The Frost by John Marsden

The Third Day, the Frost Cover

 

The Last Hour by Harry Sidebottom

The Last Hour Cover

 

Usagi Yojimbo: Seasons by Stan Sakai

Usagi Yojimbo Seasons

 

The Grace Year by Kim Liggett

The Grace Year Cover

 

The Last Second by Catherine Coulter and J. T. Ellison

The Last Second Cover

 

Season of Storms by Andrzej Sapkowski

Season of Storms Cover

 

Edge of Eternity by Ken Follett

Edge of Eternity Cover

 

 

Well that’s the end of this list.  As you can see, even with the apparent scarcity of appropriately titled books, there are still a few good reads out there that feature a unit of time in the title.  All 10 entries above are pretty fun reads and are worth checking out in their own way.  Let me know which of the above books you enjoyed in the comments below and I will be interested in hearing about your favourite books with units of time in the title.

Book Haul – 7 November 2021

I have just had a particularly awesome and amazing book day after receiving a massive parcel from Hachette Australia (see below):

InkedParcel Shot 1_LI

Inside in this big parcel was an impressive collection of current and upcoming releases, including several amazing books that I have been looking forward to for a very long time.

Parcel Shot 2

As these books are likely to be some of the main reads I check out in the next few months, I thought I would take this opportunity to gloat about, I mean highlight, what I got and why they are so awesome.

Each of the following books are really amazing, and I cannot wait to see how each and every single one of them turns out.

The Honour of Rome by Simon Scarrow

The Honour of Rome Cover

The first of these new books is the awesome historical fiction read, The Honour of Rome by Simon Scarrow.  This is the latest entry in Scarrow’s long-running Eagles of the Empire series, which chronicles the adventures of two Roman officers in a range of different conflicts (see my reviews for some of the other Eagles of the Empire novels, The Blood of Rome, Traitors of Rome and The Emperor’s Exile, as well as Scarrow’s other 2021 release, Blackout). This latest book has more of a historical crime fiction angle to it, with the protagonists facing off against gangsters in ancient London. I have already started this cool book and I cannot wait to see how it turns out.

 

Cytonic by Brandon Sanderson

Cytonic Cover

Next, we have one of my most anticipated novels for 2021, Cytonic by Brandon Sanderson.  Cytonic is the third novel in the epic Skyward series, a particularly awesome young adult science fiction series. The first two novels in this series, Skyward (one of the best books of 2018) and Starsight (one of the best books of 2019), were extremely awesome and I have no doubt that Cytonic is going to be another exceptional read.

 

Leviathan Falls by James S. A. Corey

Leviathan Falls Cover

I was also lucky enough to receive Leviathan Falls by James S. A. Corey, easily one of the biggest science fiction releases of the year. Leviathan Falls is the final book in the iconic Expanse series, and looks to wrap up this massive series.  I had a lot of fun with the last few entries in this series (check out my review for Tiamat’s Wrath), and I am extremely curious to see how this exceptional series comes to an end.

 

All of us Villains by Amanda Foody and Christine Lynn Herman

All of us Villains Cover

One of the more interesting novels I recently received was the cool sounding All of us Villains by the writing team of Amanda Foody and Christine Lynn Herman. This intriguing novel features a magical battle royal between teenagers in a small town, and I am very curious to see how everything turns out.

 

Blindspace by Jeremy Szal

Blindspace Cover

The next book I want to highlight is the compelling science fiction epic, Blindspace by Australian author Jeremy Szal. This is the sequel to one of the best debuts of last year, Stormblood, which contained an amazing and elaborate narrative about an alien-based conspiracy on a giant space station. This next book, Blindspace, looks to continue the impressive story from Stormblood, and I look forward to seeing where Szal’s story goes next. This is a pretty massive book, so I am going to have to make a fair bit of room in my reading schedule to check it out, and I think it is going to be worth it.

 

The Bone Shard Emperor by Andrea Stewart

The Bone Shard Emperor Cover

Another great sequel I have received is The Bone Shard Emperor by Andrea Stewart. This fantastic novel is the intriguing sequel to The Bone Shard Daughter, a great debut from last year that featured a compelling fantasy realm and some unique magic. This sequel has a very interesting story to it and I cannot wait to see how everything unfolds.

 

The Judge’s List by John Grisham

The Judge's List Cover

I also received the latest book from crime fiction legend John Grisham, The Judge’s List. While I have not had the pleasure of reading any of Grisham’s works in the past, this one sounds very fun, as it features a serial killer who also happens to be a judge. I am sure that this is going to be an outstanding read and I cannot wait to check it out.

 

Galaxias by Stephen Baxter

Galaxias Cover

I was also lucky enough to grab a copy of the new Stephen Baxter science fiction novel, GalaxiasGalaxias is an awesome and fun sounding novel that tries to envision what would happen to the world if the sun suddenly went out. I love the fantastic concept contained in this book, and I think that Galaxias is going to be a pretty wild ride.

 

Warriors of God by Andrzej Sapkowski

Warriors of God Cover

One of the more unique books I recently received was the latest translated novel from fantasy legend Andrzej Sapkowski (of The Witcher fame), Warriors of GodWarriors of God is the second book in his Hussite trilogy, an interesting fantasy/historical fiction hybrid series, and it follows on from his 2020 release, The Tower of Fools.  The first book in this series was really crazy and very entertaining, and I look forward to seeing what happens to Sapkowski’s unique protagonists next.

 

World’s Edge by David Hair

World's Edge Cover

The next book I received is the second entry in David Hair’s Tethered Citadel series, World’s Edge. This cool fantasy series follows a group of explorers who find themselves in all manner of trouble as they attempt to find a legendary source of magic.  I rather enjoyed the first book in this series and I cannot wait to see what happens next.

 

Asterix and the Griffin by Jean-Yves Ferri and Didier Conrad

Asterix and the Griffin Cover

The final read I received from Hachette was the latest Asterix comic, Asterix and the Griffin.  I have been a big fan of this series since I was a kid, so I was pretty excited when I saw that the publisher had included a copy for me.  This latest comic has a fun sounding story about the heroes journeying to Eastern Europe in search of a legendary monster, and I am sure that it will be a fun and amusing read.

 

Well that’s the end of this latest Book Haul post.  As you can see I have quite a bit of reading to do at the moment thanks to all these awesome books that have come in.  Let me know which of the above you are most interested in and make sure to check back in a few weeks to see my reviews of them.

The Tower of Fools by Andrzej Sapkowski

The Tower of Fools Cover

Publisher: Gollancz (Trade Paperback – 27 October 2020)

English Translation by David French

Series: Hussite trilogy – Book One

Length: 549 pages

My Rating: 4.25 out of 5 stars

From legendary Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski comes the first English translation of his 2002 release, The Tower of Fools, an intriguing and exciting fantasy/historical fiction hybrid novel that takes the reader on a weird and entertaining adventure.

1425, Silesia (South Western Poland and parts of Czechia).  War is brewing as the Catholic Church fights against the Hussites in a brutal religious struggle.  As the entire region begins to degenerate into conflict and chaos, a young doctor and amateur magician, Reinmar of Bielau, known as Reynevan, finds himself in all manner of trouble when he is caught in bed with the beautiful wife of a knight.

As Reynevan makes his escape, a member of the knight’s family, the powerful Stercza clan, is unintentionally killed, and the rest of the Stercza’s swear vengeance upon him.  Worse, Reynevan’s forays into magic have made him a target of the inquisition, who wish to have an extended and unpleasant chat about his arcane hobbies.  With a massive price on his head, Reynevan is forced to flee into the wilderness to survive as bounty hunters scour the countryside trying to find him.

Calling upon old friends, Reynevan looks for anyway to escape from his pursuers while also attempting to ‘rescue’ the knight’s beautiful wife.  Teaming up with an odd group of comrades, Reynevan makes his way throughout Silesia while attempting to outfox his pursuers.  However, his adventures have inadvertently placed him in the middle of a dangerous conspiracy, one that could change the entire fabric of the region and which threatens everyone he loves.  As Reynevan attempts to work out just what he has become involved with, his path leads him to the infamous Tower of Fools, an asylum for the insane and the heretical.  Can Reynevan escape the danger he finds himself in, or will his adventures cost him his life and his mind?

The Tower of Fools is a compelling and unique novel from veteran author Andrzej Sapkowski, who is best known for his iconic The Witcher novels.  This novel is the first entry in Sapkowski’s Hussite trilogy, which is the main series he has authored outside of The Witcher books.  The Tower of Fools was originally released back in 2002 under the original title Narrenturm, and while it has previously been translated into several other European languages, this version represents the first English translation of the book.  The translation of The Tower of Fools was done by David French, who has previously translated several Witcher novels, and no doubt we can expect the next two novels in the series (previously published in 2004 and 2006) to be translated and released in the coming years.  While I really enjoyed The Witcher television series, I must admit that I am not too familiar with Sapkowski’s writing, having so far only read the 2018 translation of The Witcher standalone novel Season of Storms.  However, due to the inevitable interest that was going to surround The Tower of Fools, I was quite keen to check out this book, and I ended up really enjoying it due to its captivating narrative, outrageous characters and excellent use of some distinctive historical fiction elements.

This novel from Sapkowski contains a fantastic and enjoyable narrative that proves surprisingly hard to put down at times.  The author has done a fantastic job blending together interesting historical fiction and fantasy elements that come together to create a distinctive adventure story.  The Tower of Fools is mostly told from the perspective of its central character, Reynevan, although several other perspectives are occasionally used throughout the novel.  What I liked about this book was the fact that it was a fast-paced, event-laden narrative that showered the reader with all manner of action and intrigue.  Reynevan and his companions essentially run into a different dangerous obstacle, major historical event or dastardly opponent every chapter, which they are forced to overcome or escape from in short order.  This ensures that the reader is constantly on their feet as they are never certain what new trouble or adventure lies on the horizon.  In addition, there is also a subtle line of intrigue that sees a sinister conspiracy begin to unfold around the protagonist as he finds himself in the midst of a series of murders and political manoeuvrings.  While this seems like a lot of elements for one book, it comes together surprisingly well into a cohesive and exhilarating narrative that I quite enjoyed, and which serves as an impressive start to the entire Hussite trilogy.  There are a lot of fun elements to this book, and I particularly want to point out the rather entertaining introductions that occur at the start of each chapter, giving the reader a humorous heads-up of what is to come throughout the series.  I did find it interesting that the titular Tower of Fools, which is referenced strongly throughout the official synopsis for this book, does not show up until really late in the book and is only a setting for a relatively short period.  While this book does contain several great and dark scenes in this location, this novel might have been more interesting if more of the story was featured in this asylum.  Still, I had an awesome time getting through The Tower of Fool’s cool story, and it was an absolute thrill ride from start to finish.

One of the major things that I liked about The Tower of Fools is the way in which Sapkowski complimented his entertaining narrative with a huge selection of distinctive characters.  This includes the main protagonist of the novel, Reynevan, the foolhardy student doctor and magician who serves as the main point-of-view character.  While he is the driving force for most of The Tower of Fools’ narrative, I actually found Reynevan to be a little annoying, especially as his impulsive nature, which is mostly driven by unrealistic ideas of heroism and romance, continues to get him into trouble.  This becomes especially annoying when his stupid decisions endanger his friends, whose determination to point out Reynevan’s mistakes help to make them more likeable.  Despite being a typical foolish young male protagonist, Reynevan does grow on you a bit as the book progresses and it proves hard not to relate to some of his impulses at time.  While his actions did occasionally exasperate me, I really did enjoy him as a character, and his keen insights and fun antics ensure that the reader has a great time following him throughout the course of the novel.

In addition to Reynevan, the main two side characters of The Tower of Fools are the fun duo of Scharley and Samson, two very different men who become Reynevan’s travelling companions.  Both of these characters are extremely entertaining in their own right, and Sapkowski weaves some great narrative threads around them.  Scharley is a crude, belligerent and surprisingly dangerous priest who leaves his imprisonment in a monastery to assist Reynevan.  Scharley serves as the main voice of reason and caution for much of the book and proves to be an interesting counterpoint to the youthful and impulsive Reynevan, whom he often has to threaten with violence in an attempt to get him to do the logical or sane course of action.  Their other companion is Samson, a giant of a man with an intense intelligence, who may or may not be possessed by a demon.  Samson is a really fun addition to the group, and I really enjoyed him as a character thanks to his unique demeanour and characterisation.  These two companions are quite intriguing in their own way and it was a lot of fun to see them interact with Reynevan and the other characters they come across.  This book also contains a multitude of extra characters, many of whom have their own intriguing storyline or character trait.  While many of these characters are entertaining and interesting additions to the plot, I think that Sapkowski might have slightly overdone it with the side characters.  While I did my best, there were honestly way too many supporting cast members to keep track of at times, especially as a lot of characters appeared or reappeared out of nowhere with very little explanation.  Still, this chaotic use of characters fits in very well with The Tower of Fool’s event-laden narrative, and it did not have too severe an impact on my enjoyment of the book.  The more distinctive characters proved to be quite entertaining and I had a good time seeing where some of their arcs ended up.

Sapkowski also makes impressive use of some cool historical fiction elements to tell his unique story.  The Tower of Fools is set in the early 15th century in an area of the world that is experiencing a lot of turmoil, Silesia.  Much of the book’s plot revolves around the major conflict of the period between the Catholic Church and the Hussites, a religious offshoot that was declared heretical and which the Church launched several Crusades against.  This proves to be a fascinating background to the main story, and Sapkowski features a lot of interesting Eastern European historical inclusions throughout his book.  This includes a range of references to key elements of regional history and politics that were quite intriguing, as well as the use of several major historical figures in varying roles, including some cameos from people like Gutenberg and Copernicus.  The author does a pretty good job of explaining these historical elements to the reader, although I did have to do some independent research to answer a few questions and fill in a few gaps.  A lot of this was due to my somewhat lacking knowledge of Eastern European medieval history, and those readers with a little more appreciation for the location will no doubt follow along a little better.  I did think that The Tower of Fools contains a rather excellent depiction of the landscape and the people that would have existed during this bleak period.  The various bits of intrigue, plots and war that occur throughout the book really fit into Sapkowski’s impressive and dark, setting, and it definitely helped to enhance part of the book’s story.  This was also the perfect setting for the various magical elements that occurred throughout the book, as their darker aesthetic matched the location to a tee, especially as there are a number of scenes set out in the dangerous and monster-filled woods.  All of this makes for a great setting, and I had an excellent time seeing this historical setting be put to amazing use throughout The Tower of Fools.

The Tower of Fools by Andrzej Sapkowski is an enjoyable and fun novel that takes the reader on an epic adventure back to a dark version of historical Eastern Europe.  Filled with some great characters, intriguing historical features and a fantastic story, The Tower of Fools turned out to be quite a captivating read.  I look forward to seeing how the rest of the Hussite trilogy unfolds and I imagine I will be in for an exciting ride.  The Tower of Fools comes highly recommended and it should prove to be an excellent read to any fans of Andrzej Sapkowski and The Witcher novels.

WWW Wednesday – 25 November 2020

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

FireflyGenerations by Tim Lebbon (Hardcover)

Firefly Generations

After waiting a year for this book to come out, I finally get the chance to check out the latest Firefly tie-in novel, Firefly: Generations by Tim Lebbon.  Generations see’s the crew of Serenity follow a mysterious map to an ancient generation ship in the hope of gaining plunder.  However, something dangerous lies in wait for them, something that absolutely terrifies their resident psychic River.  I have been really enjoying the new Firefly tie-in books over the last couple of years (make sure to check out my reviews for the previous books, Big Damn Hero, The Magnificent Nine and The Ghost Machine) and so far Generations is living up to the rest of the series.  I am really enjoying this book and should hopefully finish it off in the next couple of days.

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (Audiobook)

The Thursday Murder Club Cover

I started listening to The Thursday Murder Club earlier this week and I am currently about halfway through it.  The Thursday Murder Club is the debut novel from British comedian and television personality Richard Osman and follows a group of retired crime enthusiasts as they attempt to solve a brutal murder at their retirement village.  This is a very clever and extremely funny novel and I am having a wonderful time listening to it.

What did you recently finish reading?

The Tower of Fools by Andrzej Sapkowski (Trade Paperback)

The Tower of Fools Cover

The Salvage Crew by Yudhanjaya Wijeratne (Audiobook)

The Salvage Crew Cover

What do you think you’ll read next?

The Emperor’s Exile by Simon Scarrow (Trade Paperback)

The Emperor's Exile Cover

That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

WWW Wednesday – 18 November 2020

WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Taking on a World of Words, where bloggers share the books that they’ve recently finished, what they are currently reading and what books they are planning to read next. Essentially you have to answer three questions (the Three Ws):

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

So, let’s get to it.

What are you currently reading?

The Tower of Fools by Andrzej Sapkowski (Trade Paperback)

The Tower of Fools Cover

From the mind of Andrzej Sapkowski, best-selling author of The Witcher novels, comes the first English translation of his 2002 release, The Tower of Fools.  This is an interesting novel that blends together Eastern European historical fiction with some curious fantasy elements.  I am about 100 pages in at the moment and so far it is quite an intriguing read.  Looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

The Salvage Crew by Yudhanjaya Wijeratne (Audiobook)

The Salvage Crew Cover

The Salvage Crew is a fantastic science fiction adventure novel that I decided to quickly check out this week, mainly because it was narrated by Nathan Fillion.  The book follows a small salvage crew (bet you didn’t get that from the title) who head to an alien planet to do a routine salvage of a crashed ship, right before things get really complicated for them.  I am making some good progress with this audiobook and should hopefully finish it off in a day or two.  So far it is a pretty awesome story and I am really enjoying it.

What did you recently finish reading?

Star TrekDiscoveryDie Standing by John Jackson Miller (Audiobook)

Die Standing Cover

The Law of Innocence by Michael Connelly (Trade Paperback)

The Law of Innocence Cover

The Queen’s Captain by Peter Watt (Trade Paperback)

The Queen's Captain Cover

The Kingdom of Liars by Nick Martell (Audiobook)

The Kingdom of Liars Cover

What do you think you’ll read next?

Firefly: Generations by Tim Lebbon (Hardcover)

Firefly Generations

That’s it for this week, check back in next Wednesday to see what progress I’ve made on my reading and what books I’ll be looking at next.

Book Haul – 19 September 2020

It has been a while since I have done a Book Haul post, so I figured it was a good time to look back at some of the amazing books that I have received in the last couple of weeks.  I have actually received quite an impressive haul recently, made up of a number of exciting and intriguing books, including a few novels that I have been looking forward to for some time.  Each of the books below have a lot of potential and I am really keen to check them all out as soon as I can.

Star Wars: Thrawn Ascendancy: Chaos Rising by Timothy Zahn

Thrawn Ascendancy - Chaos Rising Cover

The first entry on this book haul had to be the book that I am most looking forward to reading, Chaos RisingChaos Rising is the first novel in a brand new Star Wars trilogy from the amazing Timothy Zahn that focuses on the early days of his most iconic character, Grand Admiral Thrawn.  This is one of my most anticipated reads for 2020 due to how much I loved all three novels in Zahn’s previous Thrawn trilogy (Thrawn, Alliances and Treason), and it is sure to be an outstanding and epic read.

Dead Man in a Ditch by Luke Arnold

Dead Man in a Ditch Cover

Dead Man in a Ditch is the intriguing sounding follow-up to the urban fantasy novel, The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold.  The Last Smile in Sunder City was a great book that came out earlier in the year and I cannot wait to see how Arnold follows it up in this second novel.

Lionhearts by Nathan Makaryk

Lionhearts Cover

A cool and awesome sounding retelling of the legend of Robin Hood, Lionhearts should make for a pretty epic read.

A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik

A Deadly Education Cover

The House of Lamentations by S. G. Maclean

The House of Lamentations Cover

The House of Lamentations is a compelling historical thriller that will serve as the final book in MacLean’s fantastic Damien Seeker series.  I really enjoyed reading the previous two entries in this series, Destroying Angel and The Bear Pit, and I cannot wait to see how the story ends.

The Tower of Fools by Andrzej Sapkowski

The Tower of Fools Cover

Another intriguing series from Andrzej Sapkowski, author of The Witcher novels, yeah, now that is something I need to check out.  This new release is the first English translation of The Tower of Fools, which Sapkowski wrote some years ago.  It sounds pretty damn awesome and I cannot wait to see how it turns out.

The Evening and the Morning by Ken Follett

The Evening and the Morning Cover


Battle Ground
by Jim Butcher

Battle Ground Cover

Battle Ground is the 17th entry in the acclaimed urban fantasy series from Jim Butcher, The Dresden Files.  I have been meaning to get into The Dresden Files for some time now, and this could be a good opportunity to check it out.

The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart

The Bone Shard Daughter Cover

This is an intriguing sounding fantasy debut from a new author that could be worth checking out.  The Bone Shard Daughter has a fantastic plot synopsis behind it and I really love the book’s elaborate cover.  Hopefully this turns out to be an epic and enjoyable read and I am looking forward to reading it.

River of Gold by Anthony Riches

River of Gold Cover

The latest entry in a long-running and enjoyable Roman historical fiction series.  It has been a while since I have read an Anthony Riches novel, but River of Gold sounds like a great new entry and I think I may try and read it next.

The Left-Handed Booksellers of London by Garth Nix

The Left-Handed Booksellers of London Cover

The final entry in this post is The Left-Handed Booksellers of London, a new standalone young adult fantasy novel from talented Australian author Garth Nix.  Nix is an amazing author who I have been a fan of for years.  I really enjoyed his last standalone novel, Angel Mage, and this new book also sounds really fun.

Well that’s the end of this latest Book Haul post.  As you can see I have quite a bit of reading to do at the moment thanks to all these awesome books that have come in.  Let me know which of the above you are most interested in and make sure to check back in a few weeks to see my reviews of them.

Season of Storms by Andrzej Sapkowski

Season of Storms Cover.jpg

Publication: Gollancz

English Edition Translated by David A. French

Publication Date – 19 April 2018

 

The legendary Andrzej Sapkowski returns with a fun and exhilarating addition to one of the best fantasy franchises to ever come out of Europe, The Witcher.

Geralt of Rivia is a Witcher, a powerful mutant tasked with protecting ordinary people from the monsters that infest the various kingdoms and lands of the Continent.  Witchers wield a range of weapons in the fight against evil, from magical signs to powerful potions.  However, their main weapons are two swords: one made of steel, the other made of silver.  These swords are a symbol of status for a Witcher and are irreplaceable.

However, after being falsely arrested by corrupt city guards, Geralt’s swords disappear, having been stolen by unknown thieves.  Upon his release, Geralt will move heaven and earth to reclaim his weapons.  But all manner of people desire the weapons of a Witcher, and his search only throws up false leads.

The theft could not have come at a worse time.  In order to obtain his freedom, Geralt is coerced by the sorceress known as Coral into hunting a demon around the sorcerer stronghold of Rissberg.  Geralt must determine who among the fortress’s scheming sorcerers is summoning the demon forth, and stop their rampage.  At the same time, he and his old friend Dandelion must contend with the various plots taking place within the court of the King of Kerack as his heirs battle for power.

Can Geralt contend with the foes set against him, or will the loss of his faithful swords result in his destruction?

Sapkowski is one of the most popular and well-known writers of fantasy fiction in Central and Eastern Europe, where his books have achieved a cult following.  Sapkowski is best known for The Witcher series of books.  This series, which was mostly written in the 1990s, focuses on the monster hunter Geralt of Rivia and his adventures throughout Sapkowski’s dark fantasy landscape.  These books served as the basis for the popular video game series of the same name, which is how many people would be familiar with Sapkowski’s characters and stories.  The Witcher books were also adapted into both a movie and television series in Poland, called The Hexer, and Netflix has recently commissioned a new American television series based on the books, also called The Witcher, which is currently in the early stages of production.

Season of Storms is the latest The Witcher book Sapkowski has released.  It was originally published in 2013 in Polish, but an English translation of the book has only just been published.  This is a standalone book that is set between some of Sapkowski’s original short stories which were captured in his second book, The Last Wish.  While Season of Storms is a standalone book, it does contain a number of hints to some The Witcher stories chronologically set after it.  It also features a number of characters from the other books in the series, including a series of interludes that focus on Nimue, who appeared in two previous books and who many may recognise as the Lady of the Lake of Arthurian legends.  The scenes featuring Nimue in Season of Storms are set more than a hundred years after the rest of The Witcher books and contain some potential hints about the eventual fate of the series’ main characters, as well as some cryptic discussions between characters that could be open to some interesting interpretations.  As a result, people who have read the other books in the franchise will really appreciate Season of Storms for these call-backs and references.  However, while the book may be especially appealing to past readers, it is also a perfect place for readers unfamiliar with Sapkowski’s work to get started, as it does not rely on other books in the series for plot details.

Sapkowski continues to explore his fantastic fantasy world in this latest book, as Geralt quests into new areas of the Continent.  Most of the story focuses on locations and settings not previously explored in previous books of the series, giving fans of this franchise a much wider view of this detailed fantasy world.  Knowledge of the world is also expanded through the fun use of excerpts from in-universe fictional books, which offers a range of entertaining facts and jokes.  Readers will also be impressed by the wide number of foes and monsters that Sapkowski has fit in this book.  Throughout the story Geralt has to contend with magical mutations, humanoid hybrids, powerful magic users, werewolves, kitsunes, gangsters and marauding soldiers.  This rich array of opponents adds a lot to the story’s excitement and is wildly appropriate for a story about a monster hunter.

Another notable part of Season of Storms is the range of intriguing mysteries Geralt needs to solve in order to complete his quest and survive.  These mysteries are interspersed throughout the story’s fantasy adventure and include the main mystery of who stole Geralt’s swords, the political mysteries in the Kingdom of Kerack and the investigation into why summoned demons are attacking communities in the forest.  These mysteries have a large level of sophistication and do a great job of keeping the readers interested and intrigued throughout the book.  The various mysteries also combine really well with the book’s fantasy elements and strike a good balance within the book.  This exceptional combination of elements within Season of Storms impressively captivates the readers and creates an enticing overall story.

The latest book in The Witcher franchise is a brilliant new adventure that stands just to the side of the previous short stories and established longer series.  Season of Storms provides pulse pounding adventure in Sapkowski’s beloved fantasy world while also telling a series of intense interlocked stories that make great use of several riveting mysteries to drag in the reader’s attention.  This is definitely a strong recommendation for those readers who have enjoyed Sapkowski’s literary works in the past.  However, general fantasy fans and those who have only experienced The Witcher franchise through the games will enjoy this excellent and electrifying read.

My Rating:

Four stars